Apple's operating system aims to shift the way we interact with our devices

Apple Senior Vice President of Software Engineering Craig Federighi speaks about iOS 7 on stage during an Apple product announcement at the Apple campus on September 10, 2013 in Cupertino, California. 

Apple's newest operating system -- iOS 7 -- will be available today for iPhone and iPad users. It may not seem as dramatic as a new device, but reports say the updated operating system will come with big changes. Brian Barrett, managing editor at Gizmodo, says it may be the company's most important new product in years. And one design change may signal much more than just a cosmetic update.

"When iOS first came out they had to teach people how to their phone as a computer," says Barrett. At first, Apple designed things on the interface to look like their real life counterparts -- the calendar on the iPhone resembled a real life calendar.

"Now that's starting to feel stale," says Barrett "Now they need to move to a place where 'okay we know that smartphones are miniature computers in your pocket, so how can we make them efficient instead of educational?'"

The new operating system also has changes to functionality, like a new control center, but Barrett says the major change comes from the updated look and feel of the phone since it has the ability to change the way we interact with our devices. 

Brian Barrett, managing editor at Gizmodo, joins Marketplace Tech host Ben Johnson to discuss. 

About the author

Ben Johnson is the host of Marketplace Tech.

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