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The cost of orange juice is too damn high

 Containers of orange juice are displayed at Cal-Mart Grocery on March 27, 2014 in San Francisco, California.

One of American’s breakfast staples – orange juice – is disappearing off our breakfast tables. In fact, a Nielsen report this week shows orange juice sales have fallen to their lowest levels since 2002. So what's behind the sagging orange juice sales? Here are some contributing factors to sip on:

Growing Competition

Sales for coffee, pomegranate juice, and sports and energy drinks are up. 

Bacterial Disease

A bacterial disease that is sometimes called “citrus greening” or “yellow dragon disease” is being spread by an invasive bug from Asia. The USDA reports the orange-tree population has shrunk nearly a quarter since 2003. All this leads analysts to predict the upcoming orange season may be the smallest crop in 50 years. 

Breakfast is less popular

Studies show we aren’t eating breakfast as much as we have in the past. 

Plus, it's expensive.

According to Nielsen, a gallon of “OJ” now  goes for about $6.50.

 

So, in the near-term, it looks like several forces our driving our breakfast mainstay into a luxury buy.

 

 

 

 

 

About the author

Dan Gorenstein is the senior reporter for Marketplace’s Health Desk. You can follow him on Twitter @dmgorenstein.

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