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What are you reading this summer?

Summer is here and that means beaches, vacations, and finally getting to that book you haven't had time to read all year.

To assist with your summer reading list, Marketplace is compiling a collection of book recommendations and reviews for a series called Summer Reading. Five of our regular guests and commentators will be on the show during the week of June 28th to tell us one book -- any book -- they plan to read this summer. The week-long series kicks off Monday with economist Betsey Stevenson, who will be talking about her summer read: "For Better: The Science of a Good Marriage"

To go along with our radio series, we're building an online collection of your suggestions for good summer reads. All summer long we'll be compiling your book recommendations and reviews to include in our Summer Reading collection. Here's how you can participate:

POST YOUR REVIEW ON TWITTER
Send us your recommendation and review via Twitter in 140 characters or less. Just include the hashtag #SummerReading (sorry, there's 14 characters down the drain right there) along with the book title and author. Then use the remaining characters to give us your take.

POST YOUR REVIEW AS A COMMENT
If you don't want to be limited to 140 characters, post your recommendation and review as a comment in this blog post.

SEND US YOUR REVIEW BY EMAIL
Click here to use our contact form to send in a book recommendation and review and we'll add it to the Summer Reading collection.

Happy reading!

About the author

Daryl Paranada is the associate web producer for Marketplace overseeing all daily website content and production, as well as producing multimedia features -- including the popular economic explainer series Whiteboard -- and special projects. Follow him on Twitter @darylparanada.
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Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell is perfect summer recession reading. I read it one summer while sleeping on the floor of an nearly empty house my first few months in Los Angeles. The narrator's descent into poverty should be relatable to all under or unemployed workers while making them appreciate what they do have.

So far, <b> A Gift to My Children- A father's lessons for life and investing <b> by Jim Rogers. It is is a quick easy read but is packed with ideas that you will leave you thinking about for days. Followed by <b> Northanger Abbey<b> by Jane Austen. This is my second favorite Jane Austen book. The characters just jump off the page. At the same time, I picked up <b>Abundance: Marie Antoinette<b> by Sena Jeter Naslund. Incredible book. I can't put it down. I highly recommend this book.

Rereading the House of Niccolo series by Dorothy Dunnett.
If I can't travel in reality in the summer, I can travel many lands and a different time with Niccolo.

City, Save Thyself! by David Wylie

It's a quick read, but extremely interesting and thought provoking. It deals with nuclear disarmament and the steps we as civilians can take to promote peace and bolster our own security. The author delivers a very compelling argument and provides a blueprint for becoming an active global citizen. A must read!

I just finished Still Missing by Chevy Stevens, one of the most talked about books of the summer. It was a haunting story of abduction and fear. Graphic and terrifying, my subconscious found connections between my own life and the protagonist's, thereby keeping me up all night. Advice: don't read this if you live alone. Also, don't read at night.

I also read Devil in Pew Number Seven by Rebecca Alonzo. I picked up the galley at the American Library Association annual conference in June and, just as with Still Missing, I read it in less than a day. It is a terrifying TRUE STORY of a man obsessed with his version of perfection, and the toll it takes on an innocent preacher's family who happens to want something else. It will be released in August and I suggest you pick it up. Note: much religious references and actually very inspiring, but it is not preachy so even non-Christians will like it.

<b> Hot, Flat and Crowded </b> by Thomas Friedman, a pithy read that is motivating me to see my work as a recycling program newsletter editor as having an even more global role. Also, on the nigh stand is <b>8 Steps to a Pain Free Back</b> by Esther Gokhale, L. Ac., whihc has in two days relieved 80% of my pain while sitting at the office. Highly reccommended.

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