Watching the World Cup

Marketplace Morning Report host Scott Jagow at Munich's Augustiner Biergarten.

PHOTO GALLERY: World Cup tickets wanted
Some of the more creative ticket-seeking fans on the streets of Germany

TEXT OF INTERVIEW

TESS VIGELAND: In Germany today the US national soccer team takes on Ghana at the World Cup. Not only does it have to win this game to advance to the next round, but by Cup math Italy has to beat the Czech Republic. Odds aside it is one incredible event to attend and sitting in the stands in Nuremberg today will be our own Scott Jagow. Earlier this week he took some time out of his very busy World Cup schedule to chat with us.

SCOTT JAGOW: Well I'm actually in the Augustiner Biergarten in Munich, which is one of the oldest and nicest beer gardens in this city and we're getting ready to watch another round of games.

TESS VIGELAND: And do I need to ask what you're drinking?

SCOTT JAGOW: Oh just ein pils . . . a little beer in a big mug

TESS VIGELAND: Right. You know Scott before you left you were talking about how involved and intricate the ticketing system was and that there were a lot of security precautions, how has that worked out over there?

SCOTT JAGOW: Yeah we thought that it would be very tight security in terms of the tickets and that if it wasn't you with the ticket going in, that you would not be able to get into the game but actually they're only doing random spot checks. Only about 50-100 people a game is what I've heard. And we haven't been checked at all. The result is that people are able to scalp tickets. We've seen them go for as much as 1400 euros, which is you know more than $1400, so definitely scalping has made a presence here.

TESS VIGELAND: Any temptation to do that with your tickets?

SCOTT JAGOW: Actually I have to say I was at the Brazil-Australia game, which was a great game to watch and to watch Brazil play in person was a once in a lifetime opportunity. But the thought did cross my mind as I was walking in and people were holding up signs saying they'd pay several hundred dollars for tickets. But I decided to take the experience instead.

TESS VIGELAND: So how are the US fans over there? Are they behaving themselves?

SCOTT JAGOW: Well I don't know if they're behaving themselves. They're having a great time, we are having a great time. We've done a lot of face painting, which I've never done for a sporting event before. And there are thousands of them here and they're very vocal, they're having a great time, they understand the game. I think it does show that the United States does have a growing reputation for soccer. We played really well against Italy, but Americans have obviously spent a lot of money coming over here and supporting this team. It's the biggest presence for a US soccer team on foreign soil ever and it's very obvious when you go to the fan festivals before each game

TESS VIGELAND: I suppose Major League Soccer over here might take some heart in that?

SCOTT JAGOW: You know, Major League Soccer should definitely benefit from this. It's been a league that's growing and with another good showing at a World Cup, it only can add to that reputation and maybe more quality players will join th elague and it will continue to have more of a presence worldwide.

TESS VIGELAND: Alright Scott, well thanks for taking time out of your beer drinking to join us. And prost!

SCOTT JAGOW: Alright thanks Tess. Prost!

TESS VIGELAND: Marketplace's Scott Jagow at the World Cup in Germany. I'm Tess Vigeland, thanks for being with us.

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