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Gems among the prepaid card cubic zirconia

Prepaid credit cards (really prepaid debit cards) are hot. I'm not a fan because so many of these cards charge high fees. Remember the late and definitely not lamented Kardashian card?

Well, Flexo at Consumerism Commentary takes a closer look at the prepaid marketplace and highlights a number of competitive cards.

The best prepaid debit cards include cards with no fees, as well as rewards for everyday purchases. While credit is almost everywhere in this country, many Americans do not have a credit card or bank account. They use cash for their needs. While this might be a cheaper method of paying for products and services, it isn't always safe one. Rather than resort to prepaid cards with high fees like the popular Rush brand of cards from Russell Simmons, consider looking at some of the best prepaid debit cards available for consumers today.

Good advice. I still think prepaid credit/debit cards are a niche product. But if you're in the market for one the old adage holds: Shop around.

Mention "saving" and plenty of folks will think "denial." There's no question you're salting away some money every month and not spending it. But at Saving Advice Nate Sanden writes about how his friends think he's lucky to travel so much.

It didn't just happen that I have been able to travel a great deal. It has been an orchestrated effort. The key is that I know what makes me happy so I've concentrated on making that happen.

The savings mindset isn't denial. It's really about focusing on what you want to be doing. It's about exercising real freedom of choice.

I stopped paying for cable-TV so I haven't seen the ads, but I've heard them on the radio: Americans can visit their local H&R Block office and file their taxes for no charge The offer is good for another month. What's up with this? It seems too good to be true. BusinessWeek takes a look:

How and why would the nation's largest tax filer give its service away for free? In a nutshell: 1) H&R Block is being forced to scramble harder this tax season to compete with other filing services. 2) It's unable to offer a service that brought in customers in years past. 3) The "free taxes" offer isn't for everyone.

About the author

Chris Farrell is the economics editor of Marketplace Money.

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