PODCAST: Delta makes elite eliter, Ninja gigs are hard to come by

Trained ninjas perform during a show for spectators at the Iga Ninja Museum in the town of Iga in Mie Prefecture, Japan, on June 30, 2012. "You cannot make a living being a ninja!" says museum chairman Jinichi Kawakami. "From the very beginning, ninja had day jobs. There are many theories about what they were but some ninja were believed to have been farmers who waited for an order. Others were peddlers who used their day jobs to spy".

American markets are closed for the MLK holiday, but traders were at work around the globe today. And they had key news to trade on: on Friday, House Republicans proposed raising the debt ceiling for three months, preventing the budget clash that was expected in a few weeks -- at least temporarily.

Airlines want their elite flyers happy because they buy the most expensive tickets. If lines get too long or lounges too packed, supertravelers go elsewhere. So Delta's trying a new strategy: Make elite eliter.

There's no box for "ninja" at the employment office, but it is a real job, if not the best career path. They do exist, but their numbers are small and the gigs are just part-time these days. 

Wealthy crime-fighters take note. $4.6 million dollars is the going rate for a Batmobile. That's what Batman's car from the 1960s TV version went for at auction over the weekend. That Batmobile was made from a 1955 Lincoln Futura concept car, and the car's creator sold it.

About the author

Mark Garrison is a reporter and substitute host for Marketplace, based in New York.

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