More from Disappearing Jobs

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The Wanamaker organ in Philadelphia.

Man behind 'world's largest instrument'

Dec 22, 2014
A Macy's parade of music, thanks to the talents of an organist and a gigantic 110-year-old instrument.
Posted In: organ, wanamaker, Philadelphia, Macy's

Fishermen: Patiently waiting for something to bite

Oct 31, 2014
As cod fish disappear, we look at how the fishing industry might adapt
Posted In: fish, fishing, Massachusetts

Pattern making: A stitch in time?

Apr 16, 2014
A look at how one pattern maker in Chicago thinks about her profession.
Posted In: clothing, Small Business

Disappearing jobs: Letterpress operator (video)

Oct 31, 2013
In our Disappearing Jobs series, we take a trip through a letterpress company.
Posted In: disappearing jobs

The worst jobs in history

May 2, 2013
From leech gatherer to factory worker, breaking down some of history's worst jobs.
Posted In: Jobs

Technology takes a toll on toll collectors

Apr 8, 2013
In this latest installment of our series on disappearing jobs: the miracle of electronic toll collection comes at a human cost.
Posted In: tolls, toll collector, Jobs

Waiting for the other shoe to drop: Shoemakers

Mar 3, 2013
The shoe making industry has changed, but for one young craftsman, the old ways are still best.
Posted In: Unemployment, Jobs

A Hollywood job fades to black: Film projectionist

Feb 4, 2013
As movies go digital, a film projectionist talks about how it feels to be one of the last of his kind.
Posted In: film, movie, Jobs

The canary in the coal industry: Home coal delivery

The job: Starting in the second half of the 19th century, coal helped fuel U.S. factory growth as well as many homes with coal furnances. Coal mines were abundant in Midwest states such as Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Ohio, and railroads made transportation of coal to population hubs easy. Those in the coal delivery business would haul coal from railroad stations to local markets, factories and individual homes.

Killed by: Natural gas and other alternative fuels. In 1940, 54 percent of U.S. households used coal to heat their homes. But according to a report by the U.S. Census Bureau, that number dropped rapidly as fuel oil and natural gas became more widely available. By 1970, just 2.9 percent of the population relied on coal for home heating. Naturally, the number of people delivering coal dwindled as well.

Feb 4, 2013

The wrong kind of coding job: Telegraph operator

The job: Samuel J. Morse was awarded a U.S. patent for the first telegraph in 1840. By transmitting electrical signals over wire, the telegraph allowed for instantaneous long-distance communication. And by using a universal code that Morse developed, telegraph operators -- or telegraphers -- were able to send and decode complex messages through a series of dots and dashes representing each letter of the English alphabet.

Killed by: The invention and adoption of the telephone. Alexander Graham Bell patented the telephone in 1876 and made the first telephone call later that same year. By 1940, the telephone had become ubiquitous in American homes. The telegraph steadily declined as the telephone gained in popularity, and the telegrapher profession went with it. On January 27, 2006, the telegraph era officially ended in the U.S., when Western Union disconnected its telegraph messaging service and sent its last message.

Feb 4, 2013

About this collection

The Great Recession changed the way a lot of us thought about our jobs. But the job market in the United States was changing long before that. In this series, Marketplace explores disappearing jobs and the people who do them.

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Sustainability Coverage

  • The Kendeda Fund
  • Wealth & Poverty Coverage

  • The Ford Foundation