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Tax Day - the clock is ticking

Apr 12, 2005
Just three more days 'til Tax Day. And folks who haven't filed yet may be in for a little surprise this year. For the first time since 1986, filers have the option of deducting sales taxes on their returns. From South Dakota Public Radio, Curt Nickisch reports. Attorney and commentator Conrad Teitell has seen taxpayers claim some odd deductions over the years. Some, he says could make you even sympathize with the IRS.
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Comparing AIG and Enron - are they similar?

Apr 11, 2005
At 79 years of age, you'd think Hank Greenberg would be happy not to run the world's largest insurance company.You'd be wrong. When Greenberg took the reins at AIG, it's profits were $14 million. Today they are $11 billion. And for Greenberg, that says it all. Proof enough of the success of his hands-on style of leadership, he might say. In this regard, Greenberg is of another era. New York Times financial writer Kurt Eichenwald has written about AIG, and another major corporate scandal. Something called Enron.
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Former AIG leader steps down from other posts

Apr 11, 2005
The Oracle of Omaha was in Manhattan today. Warren Buffett spent the day answering questions from regulators.Buffett's not suspected of wrongdoing.But investigators do want to know more about some deals. Some transactions between a unit of Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway and insurance giant AIG. Tomorrow, the former head of AIG gets his chance to answer investigators' questions. We're hearing he won't have much to say. Published reports say Hank Greenberg will take the fifth.After almost 40 years at the helm of AIG, Greenberg's on his own. In recent weeks, he's been forced to sever all ties with the company he built up.And now Greenberg's stepped down from the boards of two important cultural institutions. Alisa Roth reports from New York.
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The week that was on Wall Street

Apr 8, 2005
It's Friday, which means it is time to check the week on Wall Street with stockbroker and business analyst David Johnson, this time from Washington, D.C.
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Companies open their books for earnings season

Apr 7, 2005
It's earnings season again. How good are you at reading between the numbers? Marketplace's money guru Chris Farrell joins host Kai Ryssdal to talk about some of the things you should watch for as companies open up their books.
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Goldman Sachs shifts gears on Ground Zero project

Apr 6, 2005
So this was the plan. Across from ground zero in New York, a blue-chip Wall Street firm would build a tower. West Street would tunnel under the tower to make room for a World Trade Center Memorial. But now Goldman Sachs says no. Pradnya Joshi has been covering this story for Newsday...
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Earned Income Tax Credits a boom for some businesses

Apr 5, 2005
11 days and counting. But you've probably already filed, right? There are a lot of people who can't wait for their refund checks. They are especially dear to people who fall under the poverty line and who qualify for an earned income tax credit. The government cut EITC checks for nearly 21 million Americans last year. That doesn't mean those 21 million Americans got all their money however. Alisa Roth reports from New York on how some companies take a cut right off the top.
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Welcoming perks for senior executives

Apr 4, 2005
Some executives get perks coming and going. In this edition of the Sloan Sessions, Newsweek's Wall Street editor Allan Sloan joins host Kai Ryssdal to talk about that multi-million dollar starting bonus for the new head of Hewlett-Packard.
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The week that was on Wall Street

Apr 1, 2005
It's Friday, which means it is time to check the week on Wall Street with stockbroker and business analyst David Johnson in Dallas.
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Show me the (settlement) money

Mar 31, 2005
Remember the name Jack Grubman? The telecom stock analyst accused of touting AT&T so his kids could get into a swank pre-school? It was one of many stories about skewed stock advice from analysts who had a little skin in the game. These conflict-of-interest stories led to lawsuits. And huge settlements. One involved ten banks paying almost $1.5 billion. The biggest settlement in Wall Street history. A good portion of the money was supposed to go to investors, to compensate them for the fraud. But as Marketplace's Amy Scott tells us, almost two years later, investors are still waiting.
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