emergency savings

What happened to the culture of saving?

Nov 27, 2013
When 40 percent of Americans live paycheck to paycheck, you have to wonder why saving money is so difficult. Marketplace Money’s Carmen Wong Ulrich points to declining wages, but she also says the culture of saving was lost.
Posted In: emergency savings, college savings

Encouraging new ways to save

Jul 19, 2013
Cities and other organizations are looking for new ways to encourage people to save for the future.
Posted In: emergency savings, financial education, non-profit, games

Safety Net Confessionals: My get-out-of-jail-free card

Jun 28, 2013
Listener Kurt Deutscher, a 49-year-old web developer who grew up in a low-income family in Portland, Oregon, discusses his economic safety net, which came in the form of a unique graduation gift.
Posted In: safety net, emergency savings

Emergency fund in retirement

Jun 29, 2012
Your most recent program discussed the amount and kind of emergency funds needed for people working. My question is what those of us who are retired should consider for emergency funds. William, Schenectady, NY
Posted In: emergency savings, Savings, Retirement, retirement spending

Fewer Americans saving for emergencies

Jun 25, 2012
A new study says almost half of Americans don't have enough saved to cover three months expenses, up slightly from a year ago.
Posted In: emergency savings, Savings

Savings bonds and emergency funds

Jun 25, 2012
The place where I keep my emergency fund is in U.S. Treasury I-Series savings bonds. Is there any reason why I wouldn't want to keep the emergency fund there? Is there a dynamic that I am not considering? Dave, Denver, CO
Posted In: savings bonds, I-bonds, emergency savings

Emergency Fund 101

May 21, 2012
How do you recommend investing funds in an emergency savings account? Peter, Cherry Hill, NJ
Posted In: emergency savings, Savings, family finances, budget

Emergency savings: Expenses or aftertax salary?

Mar 26, 2012
I'm a 36-year-old single professional in the DFW metroplex that tries to think long-term in my financial planning. I put 12 percent of my around $100,000 salary into my 401(k) with company match. Currently, the retirement fund is valued at about $100,000. I owe about $12,000 on my student loans (4.25 percent fixed interest, originally $80,000) and I have about 27 percent equity in my $180,000 town home. I recently refinanced my home at 4.125 percent for 15 years. My credit card debt is maybe $1,000. After surviving a layoff well (due to a generous severance in the Great Recession), I was scared straight once I started working again. I now have about $15,000 in an emergency fund and next year's bonus will go to this, too. So I have three questions: 1) Do I need 6 months of bills or 6 months of salary after tax? 2) Should I park this in savings? Or is there a better financial instrument? 3) Is the emergency fund a higher priority than nuking the graduate school debt? I appreciate your guidance. Keith, Plano, TX
Posted In: emergency savings, Savings, student loan debt

Figuring out student loans and a home

Feb 9, 2012
I have a dilemma that I hope you can offer some advice on: I am currently in the process of paying off some hefty student loans I accumulated while earning my bachelor's and master's degrees. I pay almost twice the required payment. (Please let me know if you need specific figures.) My husband and I would like to save for the down payment on a home to be purchased within 5 years. Would it be more advantageous for me to continue aggressively paying down the loans (fixed interest rate of 4.25 percent) or save as much as possible to apply to a home to be purchased in the near future? Michelle, Indianapolis, IN
Posted In: Savings, home, student loan, emergency savings