Marketplace for Wednesday, March 26, 2008

Episode Description 

Is Motorola's split a good call?

Motorola is breaking itself in two, but analysts don't agree on whether it's the best move for the company. Lisa Napoli reports.

Third World export: security guards

The number of civilian contractors killed in Iraq last year rose 17%. Not all of them were Americans. Private security firms are increasingly using third-country nationals to support the war. Gretchen Wilson reports from Namibia.

A video game that's good for you?

There's been a lot of discussion about whether video games are bad for you, and some research into whether they might actually do you some good. A game called Mindhabits is said to be one of the good ones. Sean Cole reports.

Is price too high on fast-track drugs?

Federal laws passed more than a decade ago encouraged development of leading edge drugs, as well as a way to get them on the market faster. But a study out today says that fast-track process compromises safety. Janet Babin reports.

American Airlines grounds 300 planes

American Airlines cancelled about 300 flights today to double-check wiring on some of its MD-80 airplanes. The inspections were prompted after an audit by the airline and the Federal Aviation Administration. Jeff Tyler reports.
Posted In: Travel

Taxpayers should reap bailout profits

Commentator Robert Reich wants to call your attention to a mortgage-crisis bill in Congress with an interesting twist. It would allow taxpayers who pick up the tab for bailouts to profit if the gamble pays off.

Do candidates fully get subprime woes?

This week Hillary Clinton called on the government to help homeowners more, John McCain warned against too much government action, and Barack Obama said McCain doesn't know what he's talking about. Nancy Marshall Genzer looks into whether any of them do.
Posted In: Economy, Wall Street

Deconstructing Henry

Treasury Secy. Henry Paulson spoke on financial policy today. Frankly, the speech was a bit dull. So we asked some experts to take it apart and tell us what was significant. Kai Ryssdal has more.
Posted In: Economy, Wall Street