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Marketplace PM for September 5, 2005

Episode Description 

Getting grain to market

Instead of counting profits by the bushel this year, America's farmers are worried about what's going to happen come harvest time. Alisa Roth reports on what the trouble at gulf ports might mean for farmers.

The state of labor

You probably had today off; it's a day to remember that labor unions won many of what we now consider basic workers' rights. Jeff Tyler considers the challenges organized labor faces in the near future.

New Orleans reveals that we're not well

Search teams in New Orleans have started going house to house looking for survivors. Health care providers and medical supplies are on their way to the Gulf Coast. Commentator Jonathan Winer says it's time to pay attention.

Putting yourself on the line

Hurricane Katrina sucked up and spit out everything in its path, from boats to buildings. Marketplace's Dan Grech came across one warehouse owner in Gulfport, Mississippi who formed his own one-man security detail.

Houston, we may have a problem

Former President Bush and his wife Barbara visit Houston's in the Reliant Center near the Astrodome. Will the thousands of refugees in the Lone Star state stay, or will they go? Marketplace's Bob Moon reports.

Local banks struggle to reopen

Most of New Orleans' community banks — without a national or even state-wide presence — have been shut down since the storm. People and businesses have been completely cut off from their money; Sam Eaton reports.

What's next in Washington?

Marketplace's Hillary Wicai reports that conservative political priorities like tax cuts may take a back seat, as legislators return to Washington to face post-hurricane challenges.

A look back at Judge Rehnquist's tenure

Chief Justice William Rhenquist died Saturday night; in his 33 years on the Court — almost 19 as Chief Justice — he saw the ideological pendulum swing from one side to the other. John Dimsdale reports.

Chinese textiles to support the EU again

Peace appears to have broken out in the Bra Wars. China and the European Union have settled a trade dispute which had millions of bras, sweaters and pants piling up in European ports. Stephen Beard reports.
Posted In: Canada