Marketplace PM for March 8, 2005

Episode Description 

Dan Rather makes his final exit

"If a frog had side pockets, he'd carry a handgun". Or how about... "this race is hotter than a Times Square Rolex". They call them Ratherisms. Dan Rather's Texas-fried observations from the CBS anchor chair. Tomorrow night, after 24 years, he's leaving the post. And under something of a cloud. CBS was grooming John Roberts to take Rather's place. But Steve Battaglio of TV Guide tells us someone else is slipping into the big chair...

Israel's secret banking fiasco

It's been going on for almost a year now. And no-one on the outside knew about it until this week. A secret investigation. Israeli officials call it the biggest money laundering case in the history of the state. Yesterday officials froze $376 million in assets at Israel's largest bank. Bank Hapoalim. Two dozen current and former bank employees have been arrested. And businessmen from all over Europe face questioning. Nancy Updike tells us what's known so far...
Posted In: Canada

Money transmitters fighting for survival

The fate of hundreds of small businesses hangs in the balance. These are money transmitters, often used by immigrants to send money back home. These businesses move about $45 billion a year around the world. Today in Washington, owners of several of these businesses were meeting with banks and federal regulators... basically begging for a chance to survive. As Ashley Milne-Tyte reports, it's not that they've done anything wrong. It's that some worry that they could.

Creating efficient intelligence?

Michael Chertoff has some prep work for a hearing on Capitol Hill tomorrow. The new Homeland Security chief will go before a Senate panel to defend the President's budget request. The plan is to spend $41 billion on homeland defenses, including intelligence. Commentator Bob Herbold wonders if it might not be more intelligent to think about how to save billions, first.<p>Bob Herbold, is former chief operating officer at Microsoft and author of The Fiefdom Syndrome.

Bolivia's Carlos Mesa - should he stay or should he go

It's one thing to resign...and hope the boss will beg you to stay. But Carlos Mesa seems to be testing the limits of this strategy. Especially considering that he's the boss. On Sunday, he tendered his resignation as President of Bolivia. It was his response to months of street protests and highway blockages. Many are upset over Mesa's plans to let foreign companies tap Bolivia's natural gas reserves. Today a question before Bolivia's lawmakers. Should we beg Mesa to stay? From the Marketplace America's Desk at WLRN, Dan GRETCH reports.
Posted In: Canada