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Marketplace PM for March 29, 2005

Episode Description 

Israel's budget - Ariel Sharon makes his play

It was budget day in Israel. If the budget doesnA¹t pass, the government automatically falls. Serious business. And this year, even more at stake. Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has a plan to pull out of Gaza. Opponents tried to use the budget battle to derail that plan. It now appears Sharon outmaneuvered them all. The budget's been approved. As Nancy Updike reports, all it took was political savvy - and a lot of money.
Posted In: Canada

College tuition and merit-based discounts - on the rise

Tuition at some private universities is more than $40,000 a year. Sticker shock even for middle class parents. Kids at the top of the class may qualify for tuition breaks based on academic performance. There's been an increase in these merit-based tuition discounts.Marketplace's Hillary Wicai reports the trend isn't a good deal for everyone.

Mixing rock music, with tax amnesty?

How do you get a city full of tax crooks to come clean? Rock and roll, of course. Host David Brown talks to the staff of the Louisville city government about a new rocking tax amnesty campaign.

Warren Buffett, in the hot seat

Warren Buffett is not just a billionaire. He's well known for his candor. And for his integrity. So it's of special significance that regulators want to have a word with Mr. Buffett. They want to ask him about some questionable accounting practices involving a unit of his company, Berkshire Hathaway. Marketplace's Jeff Tyler reports.
Posted In: Wall Street

Private equity firm's have money to spend

The Carlyle Group just wants you to know, it's got a lot of cash. More than $10 billion, they told us today. And that's a first for a private equity firm's buyout fund. So what will Carlyle do with all that money? And how long before other firms catch up? Alisa Roth reports from New York.
Posted In: Wall Street

Google's email may come at a price ... privacy

Today Microsoft announced plans to build identity software into new versions of its Windows operating system. These new virtual I-D cards are designed to help people shop and access services on-line. We can expect to hear critics' concerns, too...about how these ID cards might be mined for personal information. Tech innovations seldom come without a down side. Take that e-mail service Google launched recently. A gigabyte of storage and the technology to find whatever message you're looking for in a flash. So long as you're willing to tolerate ads that are custom-tailored to the content of your messages. Commentator and writer Beth Teitell's ok with that. Most of the time ...