Marketplace PM for January 23, 2006

Episode Description 

Banking on Baghdad

In Baghdad, banking would seem to be a risky business. But as Ben Gilbert reports, not only are Iraq's banks not leaving town, they're also trying to put an end to corrupt and restrictive practices from the days of Saddam Hussein.

How do we compete?

More and more companies are opting to ship jobs overseas, where labor costs are lower. But in her new book "How We Compete," MIT professor Suzanne Berger says there's more than one way for companies to survive and even thrive in the global economy. Cheryl Glaser talks with her.

They market junk food to children. Who knew??

Last week, advocacy groups and parents sued Nickelodeon and Kellogg's for marketing junk food to kids. In this edition of the Loh Down, humorist Sandra Tsing-Loh is shocked - SHOCKED - to hear this is going on.

Ford's restructuring, aka plant closings and layoffs

30,000 people and 10 factories. Those are the steely numbers behind Ford Motor's announced restructuring today. The cuts are designed to end a $1.6 billion loss last year in North America. But as Alisa Roth reports, it may not be enough.

Mine safety hearings

Federal lawmakers today focused on coal mining tragedies in West Virginia that have claimed 14 lives in the last three weeks. Scott Tong reports that there's talk of stiffer penalties and better enforcement of existing laws.

Hang on to your BlackBerry...

The Supreme Court refused to get involved in the patent dispute over the popular BlackBerry wireless e-mail device. The justices sent the case back to a lower-level judge, who could shut off the service for millions of customers. Tess Vigeland reports.

Getting their earmarks boxed

In the wake of recent bribery and lobbying scandals, lawmakers from both parties have already endorsed reforms, including limits on "earmarks." That's Beltway lingo for provisions inserted into spending bills, directing that money be spent on pet projects... often in a lawmaker's own district. John Dimsdale reports.