Marketplace PM for February 2, 2006

Episode Description 

No mo flood insurance?

Senators today heard about problems with the federal flood insurance program, which can't raise enough money to cover the Katrina payout with the premiums it currently collects. Congress is talking about raising the premiums. Policy analyst and commentator Peter Van Doren says that's not enough.

We get letters...

Kai Ryssdal rummages through the Marketplace mailbag to find out what's on listeners' minds.

Patent law history

The patent dispute that might shut down Blackberries - those mobile e-mail devices - has revived debate about US patent law. Many have been complaining that the system is in desperate need of reform. Academics say it's stifling innovation and costing millions. But for those doing the inventing, flush with patent cash, the system is working fine. From the Innovations desk at North Carolina Public Radio, Janet Babin reports.

Full Throttle Superbowl ad

People are already talking about this year's Super Bowl ads. Truckers saw an online preview of a Coca-Cola ad for the company's energy drink "Full Throttle," and started honking their horns. Curt Nickisch has more.

House leadership election

Today, House Republicans chose John Boehner as their new leader to replace Tom DeLay, who's under indictment. Kai Ryssdal speaks to our DC Bureau Chief John Dimsdale about the vote.

Iran's nuclear controversy

The International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna is considering reporting Iran to the UN Security Council. The US has been applying its own pressure on Iran by leaning on European companies that trade with them. Stephen Beard reports.

Mine safety

The US Mine Safety and Health Administration has asked coal mines nationwide to "Stand Down for Safety" -- to run through their safety procedures for an hour on Monday morning. As Helen Palmer reports, the mining industry has been getting safer overall, but critics say safety enforcement has slipped.
Posted In: Health

US/Cuba energy summit

The first-ever energy summit between the United States and Cuba started today in Mexico. For the next three days, American energy executives will meet with Cuban officials to discuss... well, it's not really clear. From the Americas Desk, Dan Grech explains.

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