Marketplace PM for December 23, 2005

Episode Description 

Weekly Wall Street roundup with David Johnson

Host Kai Ryssdal checks in with Dallas stockbroker David Johnson to talk about the week on Wall Street.
Posted In: Wall Street

The clock runs down on ABC / NFL partnership

The second-longest-running show in primetime television is about to change channels. Monday Night Football started back in 1970 on ABC. Since then, it's become a cultural touchstone, consistently ranking in the top ten during football season -- great for business for both ABC and the NFL. But this coming Monday the New York Jets will play the New England Patriots in the final Monday night game on ABC. Marketplace's Tess Vigeland took a look at the end of an era.
Posted In: Sports

Commentary: The working Poor at Christmas

People talk about holiday shopping like it's some kind of endurance test, or a battle. But that's probably less true for you the consumer, than it is for the person behind the counter. Commentator Moira Manion works two minimum wage jobs, six days a week -- and this season shea€™s feeling less than jolly.

Declining home sales

Today, the Commerce Department said home sales slumped 11.3 percent in November, the largest one-month decline since January 1994. Marketplace's John Dimsdale has the story.

Resurrecting Hilfiger

A private investment firm has agreed to buy the Tommy Hilfiger clothing company for $1.6 billion. Marketplace's Alisa Roth has more on what it may take to rehabilitate an ailing brand.
Posted In: Wall Street

Rebuilding Aceh, one year later

It's been nearly a year since a tsunami killed over 220,000 people in Asia. The hardest hit area -- Aceh, Indonesia -- isn't just looking to foreign aid to get back on its feet. As Marketplacea€™s Jocelyn Ford reports, Indonesia is finding that the horrific tragedy offered an opportunity to fundamentally change the way it does business.
Posted In: Canada

Out to sea

US imports are at all time high. If you cared to check, you'd find that 90 percent of all those presents under your tree came in on one of those massive container ships. Those ships are run by round-the-clock, and of often, round-the-year crews. A huge proportion of cargo seamen are Filipino Catholics who rarely get home for Christmas. Jen Banbury spent a day at a Staten Island port with one New Yorker who is obsessed with bringing Christmas to the people who bring us our toys.
Posted In: Canada, New York