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Marketplace for Friday, March 26, 2010

Episode Description 
Marketplace for Friday, March 26, 2010

Small talk: Drinks, island war, divorce

Marketplace's Brendan Newnam and Rico Gagliano chat with fellow staffers Dalasie Michaelis, John Haas and Stacey Vanek-Smith about under-the-radar stories: The price of drinks at a New York bar, an island war, and divorce registries.

U.K. wants a piece of space industry

NASA has a new rival, albeit a small one. The British government has unveiled its very own space agency. Stephen Beard reports.

How Tiger Woods became a bubble

With Tiger Woods announcing he will return to golf at the Master's, TV channels, advertisers and the media are all salivating. New York Times Magazine contributing writer Jonathan Mahler talks with Kai Ryssdal about the Tiger bubble burst.
Posted In: Sports

Banks in hot water over muni meddling

The Justice Department is looking into potential wrongdoing in the municipal bond market. Big Wall Street firms may have conspired to pay below-market interest rates to local governments on their investments. Jeremy Hobson reports.
Posted In: Wall Street

Weekly Wrap: Markets and mortgages

The Big Money's Heidi Moore and T. Rowe Price's Andy Brooks talk with Kai Ryssdal about what's going on with the markets and whether the government's new initiatives to help troubled homeowners will work.
Posted In: Wall Street

Chamber ads aim to stop CFPA

The Chamber of Commerce opened a new front in its $3 million campaign against financial reform legislation. It's targeting a provision that would create a consumer watchdog. Nancy Marshall Genzer reports.

Fake products get Energy Star approval

A new report from the Government Accountability Office says that getting Energy Star approval can be as easy as printing off a sticker. The Hill's Jim Synder talks with Kai Ryssdal about what Energy Star has to do to get things right.

A plan to help troubled homeowners

New initiatives are being rolled out to help struggling homeowners. Lenders will be required to temporarily lower or eliminate monthly payments for people who've lost jobs, and they'll get incentives to reduce the principal on underwater homes. Mitchell Hartman reports.
Posted In: Housing