Marketplace Morning Report for Tuesday, May 29, 2012

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Episode Description 
Greek voters will return to the polls in less than three weeks. The results of the election could determine whether Greece stays in the euro zone or exits in a messy divorce that would disrupt the global economy. Dewey & LeBoeuf, one of the largest law firms in the country, filed for bankruptcy last night after months of financial turmoil and partner defections. Today is the Texas primary. Polls show voters tend to care about the economy and immigration, but education policy is growing in importance. The food truck scene -- once a trendy diversion -- is now a normal part of city life. Sizzler and other national chains hope to take advantage.
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Australia looks to import millionaire investors

Starting July 1, Australia will offer permanent residency to anyone willing to invest $5 million in an Australian company, venture capital fund, or government bonds.
Posted In: Australia, Immigration, China
0

Housing market may finally be bottoming out

Housing prices in March were up a tiny bit from the month before, but it is the first time in seven months that the data hasn't shown a decline.
Posted In: housing market, consumer confidence, Unemployment
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Guaranteed pay agreements sink Dewey & LeBoeuf

Law firm Dewey & LeBoeuf lured partners to their firm through guaranteed compensation deals. As revenues started falling off due to the U.S. recession, Dewey still owed millions of dollars in guaranteed pay.
1

PODCAST: Robot teacher, study says 'walk this way'

Greek voters will return to the polls in less than three weeks. The results of the election could determine whether Greece stays in the euro zone or exits in a messy divorce that would disrupt the global economy. Dewey & LeBoeuf, one of the largest law firms in the country, filed for bankruptcy last night after months of financial turmoil and partner defections. Today is the Texas primary. Polls show voters tend to care about the economy and immigration, but education policy is growing in importance. The food truck scene -- once a trendy diversion -- is now a normal part of city life. Sizzler and other national chains hope to take advantage.
0

Study says Americans prefer walkable neighborhoods

New research from the Brookings Institution says Americans will pay up to $1,500 more in rent every month to live in a "walkable" neighborhood -- say, a place near their dry cleaners or grocery store or favorite restaurant.
Posted In: Housing, Suburban Living, rent, cities
0

History and pedigree do not guarantee survival for Dewey

Dewey & LeBoeuf filed for bankruptcy protection last night. In the last half century, large corporate law firms have enjoyed an enormously lucrative run. Although in the last four to five years revenue has flattened out.
Posted In: bankruptcy, Law, recession
0

Restaurant chains increase appetite for food trucks

The food truck scene was a trendy diversion. Now it's a normal part of city life. Sizzler and other national chains hope to take advantage.
Posted In: Food, Food trucks, Sizzler
0

Voters push education policy in Texas

Today is the Texas primary. Polls show voters tend to care about the economy and immigration, but education policy is growing in importance.
Posted In: texas, Education
1

Patent wars boost patent lawyers

With tech companies in expensive battles over patents and copyrights, intellectual property lawyers are in the money.
Posted In: patents, law school, employment, intellectual property
0

Poll shows Greeks favor EU bailout

A poll this weekend shows Greek voters support politicians who favor the EU bailout of Greece. Elections earlier this month rattled the markets when voters came out in favor of political groups that opposed the bailout and austerity.
Posted In: Greece, Europe debt crisis, elections, polls
1

Law firm Dewey & LeBoeuf files for bankruptcy

Dewey & LeBoeuf, one of the largest law firms in the country, filed for bankruptcy last night after months of financial turmoil and partner defections.
Posted In: bankruptcy, Law, recession
0

China and Japan cut out the middleman

China and Japan move to trade each other's currencies directly, without using the U.S. dollar to set the exchange rate. The change is a new step toward a world where the dollar is not last word in global currencies.
Posted In: yuan, yen, dollar, China, Japan

Music from this show

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Stand Up (For The Light Parade)
The Light Parade
Im so fly (Dirty South hip hop rap instrumental 2010)
M aster Hit
Clutter
Ronald Jenkees
I Wish I Never Met You
Splitsville

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