Marketplace AM for September 29, 2005

Episode Description 

Telecom lobby calling

Noticed that your phone bill just keeps getting higher? Big telecommunications companies and their lobbyists have worked hard to stall regulation of phone rates. William Kistner reports.

Dailmer's Dilemma

Key in Germany's still-inconclusive elections were German labor laws that make it very difficult for employers to fire employees. Alisa Roth reports that's making things tough for Daimler-Chrysler, which wants to lay off 8,000 workers.

Warm your home with Bio-Heat

A long cold lonely winter is on its way, and we keep hearing about rising prices for heating oil. As more Americans look for alternatives, Marketplace's Brian Watt looks at one.

Chris Farrell on poverty

Host Scott Jagow talks to Marketplace Money's Chris Farrell. He says even though it appears things haven't changed much since the War on Poverty in the '60s, they have. <a href="http://marketplace.publicradio.org/features/povertycomment/">Look at poverty with Marketplace this week.</a>

The Ape in the Corner Office

Everything Richard Conniff learned about office politics, he learned from watching apes. Well, that's not completely true. He's been watching wolves, too. And of course, lemmings. He talks to Lisa Napoli.

Getting Serius in Canada

Across our northern border, both Sirius Satellite radio and rival XM radio are scrambling to develop new programming for the Canadian market. Steve McNally reports from Toronto.

Grim GDP news

On Wednesday the White House announced it expects the hurricanes will knock up to a percent off of third quarter growth, but a recession isn't likely. What does that mean for you and me? Stacey Vanek Smith reports.

AFL-CIO: remember us

Today the AFL-CIO is holding a press conference demanding fair wages for workers in the hurricane rebuilding effort. Two days ago, the Change to Win breakaway unions had their first convention. Sam Eaton reports.

Airline unions hit turbulence

Airlines operting in bankruptcy have asked airline unions to make millions of dollars worth of wage and benefit concessions. Marketplace's Tess Vigeland reports on what power the unions have to bargain in bankruptcy.