Marketplace AM for September 15, 2005

Episode Description 

Baidu: Chinese for "tank"?

Baidu is the search engine some call China's Google. But its stock is nowhere near $295 dollars a share — and yesterday it lost nearly a third of its value. Joceyln Ford has more from Beijing.

Neither rain nor sleet nor snow...

Postal carriers can march through just about anything — but not Hurricane Katrina. This week, letters and packages are once again making their way to parts of New Orleans. Rachel Dornhelm has the story.

Thinking about Christmas shopping

Retails sales may have fallen in August, but the double whammy of high gas prices and Hurricane Katrina isn't expected to drastically slow consumer spending during the all-important retail season.

Organize here

Unite Here is the fourth labor union to defect from the AFL-CIO for the new labor confederation Change to Win. Alisa Roth reports on just how much organized labor might have to change to attract new members.

Airlines to Congress: Save us from ourselves

First the airline industry wanted Congress to butt out of its affairs and got its wish in the form of deregulation. But with four airlines in bankruptcy, they're turning to Washington for help. Stacy Vanek-Smith reports.

Katrina and HIV

Many HIV/AIDS patients who fled Katrina are now in a race for time to find new sources for the medications they need. Rosemary Pennington reports on the efforts of some agencies in Alabama to help them beat the clock.

Chris Farrell on housing

Financial expert Chris Farrell says we should stick a fork in the housing bubble: it's done. He tells host Scott Jagow that even before Katrina, economic forces were at work to cool the super-heated housing market.

Making Afghanistan work

Afghanis go to the polls this weekend to elect the country's first parliament in 25 years. Six candidates have been assassinated in the run-up to the elections; Miranda Kennedy reports on efforts to stem the bloodshed.

International wines

The US and Europe have rarely been in the giving spirit when it comes to wine.But, after 20 years of fighting, the two sides have struck a vintage deal. From London, Stephen Beard reports.