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Marketplace AM for December 28, 2005

Episode Description 

Giving back to India

Immigrants from India are putting a new spin on the time-honored practice of sending money back to their homeland. Miranda Kennedy has more.

Arbitrary rights?

Consumer watchdog Jamie Court warns credit card users often sign away protections enshrined in the Bill of Rights to get their hands on plastic credit.

Business in Iraq

GDP figures were released for Iraq this week, and the nation's economy is on pace to grow by 10% next year. As Ben Gilbert reports, rank-and-file businessmen hope that growth trickles down to them too.

Nielsen and DVR habits

The nation's tracker of American TV watching habits today gets its first round of data on viewing trends in households with digital video recording devices. Alisa Roth reports.

Storms trump 9/11 costs

The economic costs of hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma are expected to top the economic costs of the terrorists attacks by a factor of one-and-a-half. Scott Tong reports.
Posted In: Economy

Home sales outlook

The rollicking real estate market is expected to cool in some places and surge in others in 2006. Alex Cohen reports.

Casino landfall

Mississippi has opened its first land-based Casino. As Dan Grech reports, it won't be its last.

Solar-powered cell phones

A new gadget developed by Dutch scientists powers cell phones, blackberries and iPods with the rays of the sun. Janet Babin has more.
Posted In: Science

Russian resignation

Today, the Russian government loudly and publicly dismissed the criticisms of a high-profile former economic aide.Andrei Illarionov quit his post Tuesday, saying Russia is no longer free. From the European Desk in London, Stephen Beard explains that the story behind the story is mostly about market forces, not political ones.
Posted In: Canada

Causey cuts a deal

After two years, Enron's chief accountant appears to have flipped. Richard Causey is expected to plead guilty later today in Houston as part of a deal with prosecutors. He's the 16th Enron employee to cooperate with the government, and by far the most important. From WLRN in Miami, Dan Grech reports.