Marketplace AM for August 21, 2006

Episode Description 

Back-to-school shopping slump

Sales figures for back-to-school shopping so far have been weaker than expected — and that could spell bad news for the holiday shopping season ahead. Ashley Milne-Tyte reports.

Big decision for Tyson workers

Today workers at Tyson meat processing plants in Washington and Idaho are mulling whether to relocate to the Midwest after their jobs are phased out over the next month. Carol Cizauskas reports.

Signing on with ASEAN?

Asian leaders want to fast-track plans to create a single Asian economic market in the next 10 years — and the US wants to be sure it's not left out. Miranda Kennedy reports.
Posted In: Canada

Bribery business as usual in China

In China, bribery is a fact of business life. A whopping 94 percent of Chinese believe that, according to a survey by a Chinese university. Jocelyn Ford reports from Beijing.
Posted In: Canada

Indian company bids to run UK lotto

Indian firms snapped up more than $2 billion worth of companies in the US and Europe last year. Now another is eyeing the jackpot: It's bidding to run Britain's national lottery. Stephen Beard reports.
Posted In: Canada

A poorly-reconstructed Afghanistan

As Afghanistan rebuilds from war, funding deadlines and deliverables targets are having the unintended consequence of shoddy workmanship. Miranda Kennedy reports.
Posted In: Canada

Wienermobile turns 70

Oscar Mayer's iconic Wienermobile is 70 this year. Brian Bull looks at why the giant hot dog on wheels has endured as a marketing vehicle.

Expanded Alaska drilling expected

The Department of Interior is expected to announce this week plans to open 8 million acres west of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling. Sam Eaton reports.

Canada contemplates softwood deal

Canadian timber companies have until today to decide whether to sign on to an agreement to end the decades-old softwood timber dispute with the US. Jason Paur reports.
Posted In: Canada

Gold follows black gold?

The prices for gold and oil tend to follow the same market trends. They've been losing ground for a couple weeks now — and it's probably more than coincidence. Bob Moon explains.
Posted In: Wall Street