Tess Vigeland was the host of Marketplace Money, a weekly personal finance program that looks at why we do what we do with our money: your life, with dollar signs. Vigeland and her guests took calls from listeners to answer their most vexing money management questions, and the program helps explain what the latest business and financial news means to our wallets and bank accounts. Vigeland joined Marketplace in September 2001, as a host of Marketplace Morning Report. She rose at o-dark-thirty to deliver the latest in business and economic news for nearly four years before returning briefly to reporting and producing. She began hosting Marketplace Money in 2006 and ended her run as host in November of 2012. . Vigeland was also a back-up host for Marketplace. Prior to joining the team at Marketplace, Vigeland reported and anchored for Oregon Public Broadcasting in Portland, where she received a Corporation for Public Broadcasting Silver Award for her coverage of the political scandal involving Senator Bob Packwood (R-Ore.). She co-hosted the weekly public affairs program Seven Days on OPB television, and also produced an hour-long radio documentary about safety issues at the U.S. Army chemical weapons depot in Eastern Oregon. Vigeland next served as a reporter and backup anchor at WBUR radio in Boston. She also spent two years as a sports reporter for NPR’s Only a Game. For her outstanding achievements in journalism, Vigeland has earned numerous awards from the Associated Press and Society of Professional Journalists. Vigeland has a bachelor's degree from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. She is a contributor to The New York Times and is a volunteer fundraiser for the Pasadena Animal League and Pasadena Humane Society. In her free time, Vigeland studies at the Pasadena Conservatory of Music, continuing 20-plus years of training as a classical pianist.  

Features By Tess Vigeland

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Woman wins small claims suit against Honda

A Los Angeles woman sued the carmaker for saying that the Civic hybrid she bought could get 50 miles per gallon of gas, when the most she got was 42. She won $10,000 in court.
Posted In: Honda, lawsuit, gas mileage
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How going public changes Facebook's culture

Larry Dignan, chief editor at ZDNet, talks about the challenges facing the social networking giant as it tries to preserve its corporate culture post-IPO.
Posted In: Facebook, IPO
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Shopping for good financial fortune

USC professor and East Asian cultural expert Gene Cooper takes us on a money tour of L.A.'s Chinatown, explaining all the trinkets and symbols that foster prosperity.
Posted In: superstition, Savings, prosperity, lai see, li xi, hong bao, Money, luck, chinese, Chinatown
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'Education is the most important thing'

Credit union officer Niki Wong discusses how many Asian American households handle their personal finances.
Posted In: Asian-american, family, Money, finance, gold, Banks, kids, Education
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For saving more and spending less

This week's young winners are making sound money decisions with their New Year's lai see.
Posted In: Savings, kids, children
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Patience scores!

Columbia Business School's Stephan Meier discusses his new study, which says that the more patient you are, the better your credit score is likely to be.
Posted In: credit score, FICO, Savings, Money, patience
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Financial advice with teeth

The new season of the entrepreneurship reality TV show "Shark Tank" debuts this weekend. Tess speaks with the only female host of the show about how she made her millions.
Posted In: Entrepreneurship, venture capital, women, NBC, shark tank
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For saving for her own future

This week's piggy is going to a mother who spent her money to keep her daughter happy.
Posted In: children, Savings, Retirement
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Don't sweat your daily latte

Author Ramit Sethi discusses why fretting about small expenditures is a waste of time and energy. And why it's better to concentrate your energies elsewhere.
Posted In: frugality, spending, latte, Money, budget
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How much should I spend? Well, show me a number first.

Behavioral economist Nick Epley at the University of Chicago tells us what "price anchoring" is -- and how numbers influence our judgment.
Posted In: psychology, spending, advertising

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