Based in London and reporting for the entire Marketplace portfolio, Stephen Beard provides daily coverage of Europe’s business and economic developments.

When asked what he most enjoys about his work, he answers simply, “Travel.” Over the past two years, he produced a series of features on the European debt crisis, reported from the Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, the World Economic Forum in Davos, and various locations in Greece, France, Spain, Portugal, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium and the United Kingdom.

Beard has spent four decades in radio. Before joining Marketplace in 1993, he worked for 20 years as a BBC staffer and freelance reporter, in addition to time with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and with commercial broadcasting stations in Manchester, England, and Victoria, British Columbia. His reporting has taken him throughout North America and Europe as well as the Middle East, China, Australia, Malaysia and India.

Beard holds a prestigious Clarion Award for his report on the death of U.S. politician Ron Brown; a National Federation of Community Broadcasters Golden Reel award for a series on modern-day slavery; and a New York Festivals Silver World Medal for his series on the changing face of Eastern Europe.

Beard is a graduate of the University of Leeds, with an honors degree in Law.

When not working, he enjoys reading biographies and tending his small farm outside London, which includes 110 ewes, one very noisy cockerel and an elderly, non-laying hen. In addition to his impressive journalism CV, he has also worked as a deep-sea fisherman and a bingo caller.

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Features by Stephen Beard

Enron scandal jumps the pond

Three British bankers will be extradited to US to face charges related to Enron's collapse. Besides giving prosecutors more targets in the Enron case, the British decision highlights concern about the way the US extradites suspected white collar criminals. From London, Stephen Beard reports.

Niger Delta blues

The price of oil jumped on European markets today. Traders were fretting over the latest upsurge in violent unrest in Nigeria. Africa's leading oil exporter has just cut its crude output by 20%. From London, Stephen Beard reports.
Posted In: Canada, Economy

Who gets to manage US ports?

Last week, a billion-dollar Arab company won White House approval of its takeover bid for management of six major American ports. This week, the Bush Administration is being forced to defend the sale... of a British company to a firm based in the United Arab Emirates. From London, Stephen Beard reports.

Steel merger making the French nervous

A possible mega-merger in the steel industry has scared French regulators. It would not only create a company with more than 10% of the world's market; it would also put at risk thousands of French jobs. So the government is looking for new ways to ward off takeover bids from abroad.From London, Stephen Beard reports.

EasyJet feeling uneasy

The British low cost airline EasyJet is worried. Its stock is being gobbled up, and there are signs that the company is being primed for a takeover. So who are these masked market raiders? As Stephen Beard reports from London, they hail from foreign shores.

DaimlerChrysler's happy last quarter

The German-US carmaker DaimlerChrysler has earned much better than expected results for the last three months of 2005. The company is forecasting an even better year ahead. From the European Desk in London, Stephen Beard reports.
Posted In: Canada

Bird flu in Germany

Germany has become the latest European country to confirm that bird flu has reached its territory. Two dead swans were found to have the H5N1 virus. Veterinary experts have begun a 2-day meeting in Brussels to discuss further measures to combat the disease. From the European Desk in London, Stephen Beard reports.
Posted In: Health

No smoking please, we're British

Last night, British lawmakers voted to ban smoking in all pubs, clubs, restaurants and offices in England. The ban is similar to laws on the books in California and other states. The English will have to stamp out their cigarettes by the summer of next year. From London, Stephen Beard reports.

Dollar doing well

The dollar edged lower today against Asian and European currencies. But despite fears about the US trade deficit, central banks around the world are not dumping US currency. A survey of central bankers published in London shows the dollar remains by far the world's most popular currency. Stephen Beard reports.
Posted In: Economy

Tesco crosses the pond

The British supermarket Tesco is preparing to enter the US. The company dominates the British market and plans to spend over $400 million a year to build small convenience stores in the US. Stephen Beard takes a look.

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