Shea Huffman is a graduate of USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, and a fill-in web producer for Marketplace.
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Features by Shea Huffman

The Numbers for Friday, November 15: Environmentally-friendly

6

The number of tons of confiscated elephant ivory that U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services destroyed on Thursday, a move that wildlife groups says sends a message to criminal traffickers that the ivory is worthless. The stockpile was accumulated over 25 years of seizures and undercover investigations that prevented the ivory from being sold illegally in the U.S. or overseas. (Yahoo! Finance)

$80 million

Google's investment into six solar energy plants in California and Arizona that the company expects to power 17,000 homes in the United States. So far, the company has put more than $1 billion into solar and wind projects since 2010. (Mashable)

$484 million

The amount it's going to cost private trash haulers in New York to comply with the city's new emissions standards for the fleets of trucks that collect refuse. According to a new law signed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, by 2017 at least 90 percent of the city's own diesel-powered trash truck must meet the tougher standards, while private haulers have three years on top of that to do the same. (NYT)

The Numbers for Thursday, November 14: We're not dead yet

1,500

The number of refurbished typewriters one company sells every year from their website, typewriters.com, proving that there is still some demand for the seemingly outdated technology. The electronic business typewriters remain favored by law offices, funeral parlors, and anybody else who has to fill out lots of forms or make labels. (Marketplace)

$60 billion

Google's expected revenue this year, most of which comes from advertising sales, and as Business Insider CEO Henry Blodget points out, makes the company bigger than either the newspaper or magazine industries in the U.S. for the first time. (Business Insider)

$60,000

The annual income that ride-sharing service Uber has been saying drivers in LA could make by participating in the service; that's double what many cab drivers in the area make. Ever since states like California legalized the services earlier this year, taxi companies, burdened with more regulations, have been looking for ways to compete, including sending drivers to customer service lessons. (Southern California Public Radio)

The Numbers for Wednesday, November 13: Artsy business

 

$142.2 million

The amount Francis Bacon's 1969 " Three Studies of Lucian Freud" was auctioned off for at a sale at Christie's, the most ever paid for a work of art. The previous record was held by Edvard Munch's "The Scream," which went for $119.9 million in 2012. The record could possibly be broken again tonight, when Andy Warhol's 1963 painting "Silver Car Crash (Double Disaster)" hits the auction block at Sotheby's in New York. (Marketplace)

$1 billion

The total value of a cache of 1,406 artworks found last year in in the Munich apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, son of a Nazi art dealer. The German government began publishing details of the artworks in the hoard this week that may have been seized by the Nazis or lost by Jewish collectors in forced sales. Families of the artworks' previous owners are working with authorities to see the paintings returned, but the incident has raised questions about whether more art lost during the Holocaust still resides in private collections. (Bloomberg)

$0

The amount one group of Romanian art thieves made off of their heist last year of two drawings by Monet and one painting each by Gauguin, Picasso, Matisse, Lucian Freud and Jacob Meyer de Haan from a Rotterdam museum. Speculation in the press initially had valued the stolen works at around $400 million, but the high-profile nature of the theft made the paintings and drawings impossible to sell, at least for the criminals inexperienced in the black market of stolen art. (The New York Times)

The Numbers for Tuesday, November 12: Watching TV

5

The number of months Russian fans of "Game of Thrones" had to wait after the U.S premiere to watch new episodes, driving many to pirate copies on torrent sites. Next year's season will be different, though: HBO signed a deal with a Russian pay-TV group to ensure the fourth season coincides with U.S. air dates. (Bloomberg)

113,000

The number of cable and satellite TV subscribers that cut ties with their companies in the last financial quarter, capping off the worst 12-month period of losses for the industry. Analysts claim the rate of cord-cutting has slowed though, and revenue for pay-TV companies actually climbed during the period. (The Hollywood Reporter)

Philippines: How to help typhoon victims

At a time when everyone is trying to help out, a look at the top charities that will make good use of your donations.
Posted In: Super Typhoon Haiyan, philippines, disaster relief

The Numbers for Monday, November 11: Good news for consumers

$6 billion

The amount of money the United States Post Office expects to lose this year, a loss they hope to reduce after inking a new deal with Amazon to start offering package delivery on Sundays. The partnership will start its service in New York and Los Angeles but Amazon expects to roll out the program in more cities next year. (Marketplace)

8

The time of day (p.m.) on Thanksgiving when Target will open its doors to shoppers looking to get a head start on Black Friday deals. The new opening time is an hour earlier than last year, and will see the stores remaining open until 11 p.m. the following day. How many bargain-hunters will use this as an excuse to skip out on Turkey Day dish-duty? (Yahoo! Finance)

$1,000

The amount of cash per employee that "patent trolls" have demanded from small businesses simply for using everyday office equipment the patent licensing companies claim they hold patents for. The Senate Commerce Committee held talks last week on a bill aimed at curbing patent troll practices, including this method of sending thousands of letters not to manufacturers, but their consumers, demanding they pay up for using the disputed technologies. (Ars Technica)

The Numbers for Friday, November 1: People

2,364,000

The number of workers who quit their jobs in August, an 11 percent increase compared to last year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That might be a good sign for the economy and job market, though, as more people feel confident enough in their ability to find better employment and affordable healthcare to leave work. (Marketplace)

550,000

The number of people who actively pitch, refine, and vote on ideas for new consumer product inventions created by the New York City startup Quirky. The company has found success using the crowd-sourcing approach with inventions like a flexible power strip and inventive storage containers that it sells through retailers like Target and Home Depot. Inventors and members who contribute to each product get a share of the revenue, and the company expects sales to reach $50 million this year. (Forbes)

6

The number of people who were able to successfully enroll in the new federal health insurance exchange in the first day of their availability, according to the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. (CNBC)

The Numbers for Tuesday, October 29: Keeping track of important things

$886,000

The amount one Norwegian man discovered he had made on a forgotten $27 investment into bitcoins he made four years ago. The value of the digital currency has fluctuated wildly over the past few years since it was introduced, but reached a high of $197 per coin in October. The man said he has sold about a fifth of his 5,000-coin share to buy an apartment. (The Guardian)

20%

The portion of online consumer tracking data that advertising firms say is inaccurate. The culprit? Cookies, the files that websites install on computers to track consumers. The technology is becoming less and less useful as more people browse on mobile devices (on which cookies don't work) and opt-out of cookies altogether. (The Wall Street Journal)

$8.8 billion

The money the National Retail Federation estimates that the retail industry lost last year to "wardrobing," the practice of buying an expensive outfit, wearing it once to twice to a party or other engagement, and then returning it for a refund. To attempt to curb the practice -- which is in fact illegal -- Bloomingdale's will start attaching large, 3-inch black plastic tags to dresses costing more than $150 and leaving them on after their sale. (CNBC)

5 reasons they should bring the Concorde back

Ten years ago this week, the Concorde -- the supersonic passenger airliner operated by British Airways and Air France -- made its last flight across the Atlantic.
Posted In: concorde, supersonic jet, Airlines

The Numbers for Friday, October 25: Up in the air

10%

The amount that Southwest Airlines has increased its fares over the past year. The U.S. airline industry is expected to earn a whopping $6.5 billion this year, with many attributing profits to increased fares and charges for baggage. Southwest is one of the only major lines that still does not charge for checked bags, but the company's CEO has hinted that could change if consumers grow accustomed to fees. (Marketplace)

5

The number of years until the extension on a number of copyrighted works will start to expire. 15 years ago this Sunday, President Clinton signed the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act, which extended copyright protection for iconic intellectual properties like Mickey Mouse, Gone With the Wind, and Superman. Media companies like Disney will likely ask for copyright terms, some of which are set at 75 years, to be extended even further, while opponents will argue many works should be in the public domain. (The Washington Post)

$1.1 million

The amount United Airlines was fined by the Department of Transportation for tarmac delays that took place at Chicago-O'Hare International Airport on July 13, 2012. The fines are the largest imposed on an airline since the rule limiting delays took effect in 2010. (Reuters)

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