Scott Tong is a correspondent for Marketplace’s sustainability desk, with a focus on energy, environment, resources, climate, supply chain and the global economy. He services the complete portfolio of Marketplace programming and has reported on several special series including long-term U.S. job creation, U.N. climate talks in Cancun, Mexico, the Japan earthquake and tsunami, the BP oil spill one-year anniversary, and famine in the Horn of Africa. He has reported from more than a dozen countries. Tong joined Marketplace in 2004, serving most recently as the China bureau chief in Shanghai from January 2007 to July 2010. While there, he reported on a special series on the economics of one-child and the 30th anniversary of the one-child policy in China, the Beijing Olympics, the food safety scares in 2007, labor strikes, slave labor, child lead poisoning and baby-selling in China’s international adoption program. Prior to joining Marketplace, Tong worked as a producer and off-air reporter at PBS Newshour with Jim Lehrer for seven years, where he produced a special series from Iraq in 2003.  Tong received his bachelor’s degree in government from Georgetown University. A native of Poughkeepsie N.Y., Tong now lives in Arlington, Va. with his wife and three children. He’s an acknowledged soccer dad, and enjoys cooking, cycling (he bikes to work on a regular basis), and running slowly.

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Features by Scott Tong

BP pleads guilty in oil spill lawsuit

BP signs off on a plea over the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. But this won't be the end of legal troubles for the company.
Posted In: BP, bp oil spill

U.S., Mexico have lowest gas, carbon taxes in rich world

Among the world's most developed countries, Turkey and the Netherlands tax gas and carbon use at the highest rate; the U.S., Mexico and Canada tax carbon and gas at the lowest rates.
Posted In: climate, carbon tax, greenhouse gases, subsidies

Does the fracking boom kill renewables?

We ask Ethan Zindler of Bloomberg New Energy Finance if a clean energy boom and the expansion of fracking are mutually exclusive.
Posted In: renewable energy, fossil fuels, energy

Europe's slowdown endangers cap-and-trade market

Europe has the largest market for carbon permits in the world. The idea is, the more a company has to pay for permits to pollute, the greater incentive it has to reduce pollution. But the economic slowdown has greatly reduced the cost of permits.
Posted In: carbon emissions, carbon credits, Europe

D.C.'s economy expects hit from defense cutbacks

Three big employers dependent on defense spending, Raytheon, Lockheed Martin and General Dynamic all expect cuts to their contracting services.
Posted In: defense contractors, defense

An artificial island will generate electricity

Belgium is building an artificial island in the North Sea to store water pumped by wind turbines in periods of low electricity demand. When electricity is needed, the water will be released.
Posted In: energy, wind power, Belgium

Fracking concerns: An extended Petro-State Frack Check of 'Promised Land'

A few additional fact checks and comments on "Promised Land," the Matt Damon film on fracking and natural gas.
Posted In: fracking

Natural gas fracking: big trouble or bridge fuel?

In our Petro-State podcast, we talk to Michael Levi of the Council on Foreign Relations about the potential of natural gas to transition us to a low-carbon future. And we play fracking BS Detector.
Posted In: natural gas, energy, fracking, climate, carbon-dioxide emissions

The battle over exporting natural gas

Sellers want a bigger market, but buyers say that will lead to higher prices.
Posted In: fracking, natural gas

End of Hugo Chavez era in Venezuela appears near

Taking power in 1999, Hugo Chavez almost single-handedly transformed Venezuelan society, wielding the country's oil wealth as a weapon. Can a strongman economy continue after his death?
Posted In: hugo chavez, venezuela

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