Scott Tong is a correspondent for Marketplace’s sustainability desk, with a focus on energy, environment, resources, climate, supply chain and the global economy. He services the complete portfolio of Marketplace programming and has reported on several special series including long-term U.S. job creation, U.N. climate talks in Cancun, Mexico, the Japan earthquake and tsunami, the BP oil spill one-year anniversary, and famine in the Horn of Africa. He has reported from more than a dozen countries. Tong joined Marketplace in 2004, serving most recently as the China bureau chief in Shanghai from January 2007 to July 2010. While there, he reported on a special series on the economics of one-child and the 30th anniversary of the one-child policy in China, the Beijing Olympics, the food safety scares in 2007, labor strikes, slave labor, child lead poisoning and baby-selling in China’s international adoption program. Prior to joining Marketplace, Tong worked as a producer and off-air reporter at PBS Newshour with Jim Lehrer for seven years, where he produced a special series from Iraq in 2003.  Tong received his bachelor’s degree in government from Georgetown University. A native of Poughkeepsie N.Y., Tong now lives in Arlington, Va. with his wife and three children. He’s an acknowledged soccer dad, and enjoys cooking, cycling (he bikes to work on a regular basis), and running slowly.

READ MORE

Features by Scott Tong

South Korean court gives split decision in Apple vs Samsung

Here in California, a jury enters a third day of deliberations in the smartphone and tablet copyright battle between Apple and Samsung. But today in South Korea, a court facing the some of the same questions issued its ruling.
Posted In: samsung, apple, patent wars

Signs that the Fed could inject more money into economy

There are new signs the Federal Reserve is getting ready to pump more money into the U.S. economy. Notes from a Fed meeting earlier this month were just released and they seem to indicate we've got another economic stimulus package in our future.
Posted In: Federal Reserve, Ben Bernanke, quantitative easing

Court shoots down EPA rule on pollution

Power plants and air regulators are working through the implications of a new court ruling this morning. The decision shot down an air pollution rule from the Environmental Protection Agency. Now regulators have to go back to the drawing board.
Posted In: EPA, pollution

Dell to report earnings, plan for the future

After the market closes, the computer company Dell reports its second-quarter numbers. Haven't thought about Dell in a while? Perhaps your boss has.
Posted In: Dell

Apple stock v. gravity: guess who's winning

THE GRAPH

 

 

THE (PARA) GRAPH

Thanks to Howard Silverblatt of Standard and Poor's, here's a visual look at Apple's stock dominance. It's a little grainy, but Apple's market value is the purple line, the umm... hockey stick. As you can see, Apple first nosed ahead  of GE, then Microsoft, then ExxonMobil.  And look where it is now. Adjusted for inflation, Silverblatt notes Apple still lags the market value of pre-burst Microsoft in 1999. By his numbers, Apple stock would have to rise 37 percent to top that. 

Apple becomes most valuable company in history

Apple has hit a major milestone. The electronics giant is now the biggest public company ever measured by stock value.
Posted In: apple

Aetna to buy Coventry Health Care for over $5.5 billion

Shares of the insurance giant Aetna are looking awfully healthy this morning. Acquiring another insurer is likely providing a bit of a shot in the arm. It's the latest in a stream of health insurance mergers we've been charting -- many of them happening for the same reasons.
Posted In: Aetna, health insurance, Medicare

Best Buy brings in a new CEO

Struggling electronics retailer Best Buy has named a new chief executive: Frenchman Hubert Joly will likely take the helm in early September.
Posted In: Best Buy, ceo

Subsidies keep Texas cotton farmers growing

The aid, which dates from the Great Depression, could end when Congress acts on the next farm bill. The World Trade Organization has ruled it's an illegal subsidy, and legislators are looking for budget items to slash.
Posted In: drought, subsidy, cotton

Falling cocoa prices hurt Colombia's war on cocaine

Some farmers who took up cocoa farming in place of coca are returning to the crop from which cocaine is made.
Posted In: Colombia, cocaine, cocoa

Pages

With Generous Support From...