Sarah Gardner is a reporter on the Marketplace sustainability desk. Her past projects include “We Used To Be China," "Coal Play," "Consumed,” “The Next American Dream,” “Jobs of the Future,” and “Climate Race,” among others. Gardner began her career at Marketplace as a freelancer and was hired as business editor and back-up host to David Brancaccio in the mid-90s. Prior to her work at Marketplace, Gardner was a public radio freelancer in Los Angeles, a staff reporter for New Hampshire Public Radio, a commercial radio reporter in Massachusetts and an editor/reporter for a small town newspaper in Minnesota.  She is the recipient of several awards including a Gerald Loeb Award for Distinguished Business and Finance Journalism (1997), an AlfredI.duPont-Columbia University Award (1996-1997) and a George Foster Peabody Award, the oldest and most prestigious media award (2000). Gardner attended Carleton College where she received her bachelor’s degree in religion and Columbia University where she received her master’s degree in journalism. A native of Waukesha,Wis., Gardner resides in Los Angeles.

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Features by Sarah Gardner

Let's do the numbers: Superstorm Sandy edition

Wall Street battened down the hatches to wait out Superstorm Sandy, which was downgraded from a hurricane late Monday, marking its first rain check in 27 years. The exchanges won’t reopen until Wednesday at the earliest.

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The bond market did hold a morning session today. And prices rose, sending the yield on the 10-year T-note down to 1.72 percent.

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Here are some Superstorm Sandy numbers: More than 7,000 commercial flights in the U.S. were canceled for today alone. United took top honors with more than 850 canceled flights. That was according to the tracking site FlightAware.com.

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And if you tried calling United for flight information, you had to wait 40 minutes to speak to an agent. (Monica finally picked up for us.)

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About 700,000 people along the eastern seaboard had lost electricity by mid-afternoon. One New Jersey electric utility had recruited 950 extra line workers and 526 tree contractors to help prepare for the storm.

'MAD' men: 60 years of spoofing the advertising industry

MAD Magazine editor-in-chief John Ficarra reflects on 60 years of parodying advertising.
Posted In: Mad Men, mad magazine, alfred e. newman, ficarra, publishing, advertising, cigarettes

Hurricane Sandy doesn't give everyone the day off work

While many workers were sent home ahead of the storm, not everyone gets the day off for Hurricane Sandy.
Posted In: Hurricane Sandy

Greece reacts with protests to a visit from Germany's Merkel

What are Greeks thinking about after a visit from Germany's Chancellor Merkel? Anger, frustration -- and some merriment.
Posted In: Greece, Angela Merkel, Whats up Europe

Goldman Sachs switches support to Romney

Goldman Sachs has long supported Democrats in the presidential contest. But not this year. Why Goldman and other Wall Street banks are throwing their support behind Mitt Romney.
Posted In: Goldman Sachs, 2012 election

Jack Welch quits Fortune, Reuters columnist gigs

The former chief executive of General Electric received criticism from both Fortune and Reuters.com after insinuating on Twitter that the White House manipulated the monthly jobs report.
Posted In: Jack Welch

Congress calls Chinese companies Huawei and ZTE a threat

A new report from the House Intelligence Committee calls for investigations into two Chinese telecommunications suppliers.
Posted In: China, huawei, telecom, ZTE

Small college Grinnell weighs big changes to financial aid

Grinnell is a very small liberal arts college in Iowa with a very big endowment: $1.4 billion. Why the financially sound institution is looking at how to control future costs.
Posted In: college, college tuition, Tuition, financial aid

Soda companies to post calories at vending machines

Coca-Cola, Dr. Pepper and Pepsi will roll out special vending machines next year.
Posted In: Coca-cola, soda, calorie

What a $3,000 car looks, feels and drives like

The new Datsun will be sold in emerging countries like India, where it will be the first car for many buyers. It will not be as safe or as environmentally clean as cars in the U.S.
Posted In: Nissan, cars

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