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Sarah Gardner is a reporter on the Marketplace sustainability desk. Her past projects include “We Used To Be China," "Coal Play," "Consumed,” “The Next American Dream,” “Jobs of the Future,” and “Climate Race,” among others. Gardner began her career at Marketplace as a freelancer and was hired as business editor and back-up host to David Brancaccio in the mid-90s. Prior to her work at Marketplace, Gardner was a public radio freelancer in Los Angeles, a staff reporter for New Hampshire Public Radio, a commercial radio reporter in Massachusetts and an editor/reporter for a small town newspaper in Minnesota.  She is the recipient of several awards including a Gerald Loeb Award for Distinguished Business and Finance Journalism (1997), an AlfredI.duPont-Columbia University Award (1996-1997) and a George Foster Peabody Award, the oldest and most prestigious media award (2000). Gardner attended Carleton College where she received her bachelor’s degree in religion and Columbia University where she received her master’s degree in journalism. A native of Waukesha,Wis., Gardner resides in Los Angeles.

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Features by Sarah Gardner

While lower gas prices at the pump make consumers happy, states that rely heavily on oil taxes may struggle.

Falling oil prices hurt state budgets

For states trying to balance budgets that rely on oil taxes, it's crunch time.
Posted In: big oil, Louisiana, severance tax
Workers install a paved driveway at the Toll Brothers Inc. Jupiter Country Club housing development in Jupiter, Fla.

Profits increase for luxury homebuilder Toll Brothers.

Do increased revenues for Toll Brothers mean the housing market is improving?
Posted In: Toll Brothers, home buying, home building, housing market
Opponents of hydraulic fracturing or 'fracking' hold placards during a rally in Lafayette Square, across from the White House.

Texas oil town votes to ban fracking

Denton, a college town in the middle of the oil patch, overwhelmingly votes against more fracking.
Posted In: denton, fracking, oil industry
CMA CGM Christophe Colomb, in the Elbe estuary.

Giant container ships make port facilities obsolete

The huge ships came into use far faster than ports expected.
Posted In: megaship, port of Long Beach, container ship, big ships, sea ports

A holiday rush at ports piles up cargo

The bottleneck could delay shipments with a strict yuletide deadline.
When the Hunt brothers bought up silver in 1979, a craze - and then a financial debacle - resulted. Speculators rushed in, families sold their silverware or in some cases, had it stolen.

The oil man who caused a silver craze - and bust

Nelson Bunker Hunt bought silver as a hedge against the time's raging inflation
Posted In: silver, Hunt brothers, silver market, precious metals

In dry California, using price to police water use

California cities don't like the word "rationing," but "pricing" can serve the same purpose.
Posted In: water use, California drought 2014, fees

What it takes to make all hospitals Ebola-ready

Training will be costly, but not all hospital staff need the training.
Posted In: Ebola, Ebola training, texas, CDC

Most seniors aren't saving enough for retirement

Seniors in 49 states don’t have the money to replace their pre-retirement income.
Posted In: Retirement, retirement planning

CEO tries to reset General Motors' brand

Mary Barra promises higher profits, but also better cars.
Posted In: Mary Barra, GM, car recalls

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