Sabri Ben-Achour is a reporter for Marketplace, based in the New York City Bureau. He covers Wall Street, finance, and anything New York—and money—related.

Sabri will say that economics and finance are really hard, but they don’t have to be boring. In fact, they mustn’t be, because they are as important to a functioning society as history and art and politics. He believes the duty of an economics reporter is to bridge that gap — to absorb, break down, and make comprehensible and palatable (as in “fun”) the economic news of the day and the decade. This — as it should be for all journalism — is in the service of citizens who must decide how to conceptualize the society in which they live, their place in it, and how to guide its future.

Prior to joining Marketplace in 2013, Sabri was the Environment Reporter for WAMU 88.5 in Washington, D.C., where his work received two regional Edward R. Murrow awards for use of sound and feature reporting, five Chesapeake AP Broadcasters Association awards, and shared in a Gracie Award for the Kojo Nnamdi Show.

As a freelancer, Sabri has reported from earthquake-ravaged Haiti, the revolution-riven streets of Tunisia, the jungle streams of Panama, and the Democratic Republic of Congo’s war-torn Eastern provinces. 

Sabri attended the University of Virginia where he received his bachelor’s degree in Foreign Affairs with a focus on the Middle East. He attended the Georgetown Walsh School of Foreign Service, where he received his master’s in Foreign Service, focusing on global commerce and finance.

Sabri co-hosts Actuality, Marketplace and Quartz’s new podcast about the conversations behind business news. In his spare time, he teaches and makes ceramics.


Features by Sabri Ben-Achour

People line up to change their Swiss francs at a currency exchange office in Geneva.

Swiss National Bank gives up the ghost

The bank surprised just about everyone by letting go of the franc.
Posted In: Swiss banks, exchange rate, euro
Mark Bertolini, CEO of Aetna.

Aetna raises its minimum wage.... Who's next?

Don't expect other companies to quickly follow Aetna on the wage front. The move is strategic.
Posted In: Aetna, minimum wage, health insurance, labor market
Shawneeka Woodard fills out a job form at the Diversity Job Fair at a New York City hotel in 2008.

A year in jobs reports

As the numbers for December come in, we take a look back at 2014.
Posted In: jobs report, employment, unemployement

The age of the community banker

Why the President appointed a local banker to the Fed.
Posted In: Fed, Federal Reserve, Bankers
Daniel Baguma, photo right, in entry to his welding shop and driving motorcycle to deliver a welded door.

Former child soldiers find rehabilitation a hard road

Programs to rehabilitate child soldiers in Congo have mixed records.
Posted In: eastern congo, rwanda, Congo
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Christmas Eve morning.

Volatility could (maybe) signal end of the bull market

There's a seasonal aspect to the volatility in the markets, making it harder to predict what may be going on.
Posted In: bull market, Volatility, stock exchange
Venezuelan Foreign Minister Rafael Ramirez speaks to journalists ahead of the166th ordinary meeting of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, OPEC, at their headquarters in Vienna, Austria.

Will Venezuela default? Investors think so

Oil, whose price has halved in the past year, accounts for 95 percent of the country’s exports and 45 percent of the government’s budget.
Posted In: venezuela, Oil, oil prices, OPEC

Cuba's open doors don't mean open for business

Despite thawing U.S.-Cuba relations, full-blown business opportunities are largely years away.
Posted In: cuba, tourism, sugar, rum, business opportunity

Congo tries to stage a coffee comeback

Farmers in Eastern Congo try to relaunch an industry destroyed by civil war.
Posted In: coffee, Congo


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