Mitchell Hartman is the senior reporter for Marketplace’s Entrepreneurship Desk and also covers employment.

A veteran Marketplace reporter, he was hired in 1994 as an assistant producer on the Marketplace Morning Report, hosted that program in 1996 and 1997, and then served as commentary editor and features editor for all Marketplace productions.

Hartman left Marketplace in 2001 to move to Portland, Ore., where he served as editor of a statewide business magazine, Oregon Business, and was subsequently editor of Reed College’s alumni magazine. In 2008, Hartman returned to Marketplace to serve in his current position, filing reports from his bureau’s base at Oregon Public Broadcasting in his adopted hometown of Portland.

Since 2008, Hartman has produced a number of broadcast series, including, "Different States of Unemployment" (spring 2009) and "Help Not Wanted" (summer 2010).

He also traveled to Egypt to cover the Arab Spring. Hartman enjoys his work as a radio reporter because it provides him the opportunity to “ask impertinent questions and exercise my curiosity to the max.”

Before his career with American Public Media, Hartman worked in human rights and refugee advocacy for the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights (now Human Rights First). He has also worked at the Philadelphia Inquirer, Cairo Today magazine, Middletown Press, New Haven Register and for Pacifica Radio, Monitor Radio, the BBC and the CBC.

Hartman is a native of Teaneck, N.J., and holds a Bachelor of Arts in Religion from Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania and a master’s degree in Journalism from Columbia University in New York.

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Features by Mitchell Hartman

Nelson Mandela's legacy is economic, too

One legacy of Mandela's fight against apartheid is activism in the U.S. against inequities in the global economy.
Posted In: Mandela, divestment, apartheid

Can you hear me now? I'm 10,000 feet above the ground

The Federal Communications Commission is moving toward lifting a long-standing ban on cell phone calls in-flight. It would permit calls once a plane reaches 10,000 feet.
Posted In: airplane mode, Airlines, airline safety

White House says no to recapitalizing Fannie and Freddie

The White House is throwing cold water on a private investment group’s proposal to recapitalize Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the giant government-owned and government–backed mortgage companies.
Posted In: Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac

Global oil prices fall ahead of Iran talks

Resumption of exports from Libya, rising U.S. stockpiles, and the Iran talks are driving down oil prices.
Posted In: oil prices, fracking, Libya, Iran

Historic $13 billion deal between U.S., J.P. Morgan

The Justice Department is expected to announce a record-setting settlement with J.P. Morgan Chase over mortgages and mortgage-backed bonds.
Posted In: JPMorgan Chase, mortgage

Geithner to start new job in private equity

The former secretary of the Treasury will become president of New York-based Warburg Pincus.
Posted In: Timothy Geithner, private equity

The new color of gold in India: Black

India is looking for investors in its state-owned oil and coal companies, a big shift for a country that is famously protective.
Posted In: Oil, India, gas

Why you shouldn't believe everything you read in the jobs report

204,000 jobs were added, while the unemployment rate ticked up to 7.3 percent in the Labor Department's employment report for October.
Posted In: Labor Department, jobs numbers

Women love Pinterest. Are there too few men on the site?

Pinterest, digital home of scrap-bookers, window-shoppers, curators and hobbyists, is on many tech-watchers list of potential IPOs. But do investors think it’s too focused on female users?
Posted In: IPOs, Twitter, Pinterest, Facebook

Will Coloradans back higher taxes for schools?

Colorado voters are considering a state measure that would increase state income taxes to fund a significant overhaul of public school financing system.
Posted In: colorado, schools

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