Mitchell Hartman is the senior reporter for Marketplace’s Entrepreneurship Desk and also covers employment.

A veteran Marketplace reporter, he was hired in 1994 as an assistant producer on the Marketplace Morning Report, hosted that program in 1996 and 1997, and then served as commentary editor and features editor for all Marketplace productions.

Hartman left Marketplace in 2001 to move to Portland, Ore., where he served as editor of a statewide business magazine, Oregon Business, and was subsequently editor of Reed College’s alumni magazine. In 2008, Hartman returned to Marketplace to serve in his current position, filing reports from his bureau’s base at Oregon Public Broadcasting in his adopted hometown of Portland.

Since 2008, Hartman has produced a number of broadcast series, including, "Different States of Unemployment" (spring 2009) and "Help Not Wanted" (summer 2010).

He also traveled to Egypt to cover the Arab Spring. Hartman enjoys his work as a radio reporter because it provides him the opportunity to “ask impertinent questions and exercise my curiosity to the max.”

Before his career with American Public Media, Hartman worked in human rights and refugee advocacy for the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights (now Human Rights First). He has also worked at the Philadelphia Inquirer, Cairo Today magazine, Middletown Press, New Haven Register and for Pacifica Radio, Monitor Radio, the BBC and the CBC.

Hartman is a native of Teaneck, N.J., and holds a Bachelor of Arts in Religion from Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania and a master’s degree in Journalism from Columbia University in New York.

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Features by Mitchell Hartman

On Victory Drive, soldiers defeated by debt: The story from Propublica

A federal law is supposed to protect service members from predatory lending. But lenders exploit loopholes, trapping military personnel in high-interest debt.
Posted In: installment loans, payday loans

Home makeovers: What to rennovate before putting your house on the market

Now that the housing market is picking up, making improvements on your home is worth it if you want to put it on the market. Which ones pay off in a quicker sale?
Posted In: Housing, housing prices

T-Mobile's bet: Customers will pay more for phones

What’s the cost of an iPhone? $200, if you pay for the rest of it through a two-year wireless contract. Now T-Mobile plans to upend the business model, asking customers to pay the true cost of the phone, and probably lower monthly wireless bills. Will their plan work with customers?
Posted In: T-Mobile, iPhone

Sit down, eat out? Not so much.

Darden Restaurants, owners of casual dining chains Olive Garden, Red Lobster, and LongHorn Steakhouse, saw profit fall 18 percent last quarter as sales slipped almost 5 percent.
Posted In: food and drink, restaurants

Could big banks help rein in payday lenders?

Payday lenders circumvented state laws by moving online, and in the process big banks became enablers (and potentially profited) from payday lending. Now Chase is making changes to protect its customers from payday lenders. Will other banks follow?
Posted In: Banks, payday loans, lenders

The new U.S. veteran: Young and looking for work

The Bureau of Labor Statistics has released data on unemployment among U.S. veterans, and the numbers aren't pretty. A big part of the problem: Many recent veterans are in a demographic which is suffering joblessness already -- young Americans.
Posted In: veterans, Jobs, Unemployment, sequester

Caffeine gum could give Wrigley a jolt

Wrigley plans to start selling “Alert” gum next month -- that is, gum with caffeine. Gum sales overall are down, and “energy” products are booming. But cities, states and the FDA are investigating caffeine marketing to kids.
Posted In: Wrigley, gum, caffeine, FDA

The sequester vs. the jobs recovery

The Labor Department's jobs report for February is expected to be decent: Signs are that the labor market continues to improve. Aren't the sequester's budget cuts going to have any effect?
Posted In: Jobs, sequester, Unemployment

Housing revives, and so do home improvement chains

As home prices rise, more owners are preparing housing for sale -- and construction companies and building supply chains are hiring again.
Posted In: housing market, Mortgages, Home Depot, Retail

Anticipating this week's housing stats -- without dread

The market for new housing has been heating up, even though plenty of foreclosed homes are for sale too.
Posted In: Housing, housing market

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