Mark Garrison is a reporter and substitute host for Marketplace. He is currently on leave, studying at Columbia Business School on a Knight-Bagehot Fellowship. Based in New York, Garrison joined Marketplace in 2012. He covers a variety of topics including economics, marketing, employment, banking, the military, media and culture. During the 2012 campaign, he reported on money in politics as part of the Marketplace collaboration with PBS’s Frontline, which won the Investigative Reporters & Editors Award.

His previous public radio experience includes newscasting for NPR, The Takeaway and New York’s WNYC. He also reported from Germany for international broadcaster Deutsche Welle. Garrison’s career spans television, radio, online and print media, including national and international travel to cover breaking news on elections, trials and natural disasters. Among his previous employers are NBC, ABC and CNN. At CNN, he was senior editorial producer for Anderson Cooper 360° and part of the team that won Peabody and duPont Awards for coverage of Hurricane Katrina and the 2004 Asian tsunami, respectively.

Apart from the news business, Mark is most experienced in the restaurant world, as a cook, bartender, manager and server. That sometimes proves useful in his journalism. Besides Marketplace, his reports and commentaries on food and drink have appeared on NPR, History Channel, Cooking Channel, Slate, CBC, WNYC and KPCC. He has been nominated for a James Beard Foundation Award.

Garrison graduated from the University of Georgia with bachelor’s degrees in journalism and psychology. A member of a military family who lived in many places growing up, Garrison now resides in Brooklyn with his wife. They enjoy culture, food and travel throughout America and abroad.

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Features by Mark Garrison

What growing global oil thirst means for economy

A new International Energy Agency report out Tuesday says global oil demand will rise by 1.3 million barrels per day this year.
Posted In: oil boom

A former high-frequency trader turned critic

Powerful computers can make hundreds of thousands of trades in milliseconds, making big money off tiny stock price differences. But is it bad for our financial system?
Posted In: high-frequency trading

Why are American credit card companies using outdated technology?

American banks and retailers are still using the same old magnetic strip cards, instead of more secure chip and pin cards commonly used abroad.
Posted In: credit card fraud, Target credit cards

PODCAST: Surprise! Smoking is a lot worse than we all thought

Hey Smoking, you can add diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis to your list too! Studying abroad in Latin America gets a big boost. And when keeping up with the Jones' means getting your own private water well.

Planning a Kickstarter campaign? Avoid these words

A new study shows that certain words and phrases do a bad job at getting you the money you need.
Posted In: kickstarter

What do our cars know about us?

Ford's CEO got in some hot water after his comments about Ford cars collecting data on drivers worried some consumers. What are the emerging privacy issues we should be thinking about when it comes to new car technology.
Posted In: Ford, big data, cars

A 1-800 number for data plans?

AT&T is offering companies the opportunity to pay for your smartphone’s data use.
Posted In: data plans, AT&T

Why non-bankers love Wall Street bonuses

This is the time of year when Wall Street bankers get their bonuses.
Posted In: Wall Street, bonuses

Coffee beans are cheaper, so why isn't my Starbucks?

From coffee to copper to corn, the price of commodities has fallen over the past year.
Posted In: commodities, gold, copper

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