Krissy Clark is the senior reporter for Marketplace’s Wealth & Poverty Desk, where she helps make sense of some of the most fundamental shifts happening in the U.S. economy, including the growth of the low-wage service sector and the shrinking of middle-wage, middle-class jobs. Clark tracks the widening gap between rich and poor in the U.S. and what it means for economic mobility in America.

Some of Clark’s favorite stories involve getting people from different parts of the economy to talk to each other. She has prompted conversations between a Silicon Valley CEO and a worker whose job he wanted to automate, brought two economists who disagreed about the effects of raising the minimum wage to Taco Bell for a debate, and set up a virtual “confessional booth” for people to reveal their financial safety nets. Clark’s reporting has taken her to abandoned factories in Flint, Michigan; the post-tornado ruins of Moore, Oklahoma; and the epicenter of the foreclosure crisis in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Before joining Marketplace, Clark was the LA Bureau Chief for KQED public radio’s California Report. She has been a regular contributor to NPR's Morning Edition and All Things Considered, BBC Radio, Freakonomics and StoryCorps.

Clark’s stories and documentaries have won awards from Scripps-Howard, PRNDI, NFCB, an Investigative Reporters and Editors Medal of Honor, and First Prize in Investigative Reporting from the National Awards for Education Reporting. Clark was a finalist for the Livingston Award for Journalists Under 35, and a finalist for a Third Coast Award for Best News Feature.

Clark is a frequent public speaker and has given talks at Google, Stanford University, the University of Kansas, Web 2.0, the Conference on World Affairs, and the Aspen Institute.

In 2009, Clark won a Knight Journalism Fellowship at Stanford to spend a year experimenting with location-aware technologies as tools for story-telling. She is the founder of Storieseverywhere.org, a location-based, trans-media storytelling project whose audio installations have been exhibited by The New Museum in NYC and San Francisco’s Gray Area Foundation for the Arts.

Clark graduated cum laude from Yale University with a B.A. in The Humanities. She grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area and likes to read maps.

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Features by Krissy Clark

What kinds of businesses go bankrupt these days?

Business bankruptcies are down overall, but companies still make mistakes. And some entire industries are in trouble.
Posted In: bankruptcy, loans, technology

Latvia wants to join the eurozone. Why?

Despite the crisis, there are still benefits of being a member of the eurozone club.
Posted In: latvia, Eurozone, European Union, Europe debt crisis

Losing "everything" is relative in a tornado

Natural disasters are great equalizers, but recoveries can look different.
Posted In: disasters, oklahoma, tornado, FEMA

Friendship crosses class lines in tornado's wake

Disasters, it is said, are great equalizers, striking rich and poor alike. But do bonds forged in crisis survive recovery?
Posted In: tornado, oklahoma, natural disasters

Tornado victims worry first response donations won't cover long-term needs

Last week's tornado in Moore, Oklahoma could cost insurance companies $3.5 billion, according to Risk Management Solutions.
Posted In: oklahoma, tornado, natural disasters

Convicted of a violent crime? Senate proposes food stamp cutoff

Democrats in the Senate agreed to an amendment that would ban anyone ever convicted of certain violent crimes from receiving SNAP food stamps -- for their entire lives.
Posted In: SNAP, food stamps, Crime

Meet the Bank of Frank, safety net provider to family, friends

Government programs aren't the only safety nets that people fall back on. In the first of our "Safety Net Confessionals" we hear from Frank Paiano and one of the cousins he helped financially.
Posted In: safety net

As Congress debates farm bill, food stamps hang in the balance

With one in five Americans on food stamps, some in Congress want to cut back on the program.
Posted In: food stamps, poverty, SNAP, Congress

What's ahead for the IRS?

To say the Internal Revenue Service is having a bad week is an understatement. And to top it all off, IRS Commissioner Steven Miller was just forced to resign. So how will that effect the rest of the agency responsible for collecting taxes to keep the U.S. government running?
Posted In: IRS, Steven Miller

Retailers around the world react to Bangladesh fire

After last month's collapse at a garment factory, retailers around the world are responding in different ways.
Posted In: Bangladesh, foreign workers, workplace safety, Retail

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