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John Dimsdale has spent almost 40 years in radio. As head of Marketplace’s Washington, D.C., bureau, he provides insightful commentary on the intersection of government and money for the entire Marketplace portfolio.

As Dimsdale notes, “Sooner or later, every story in the world comes through Washington,” and reporting on those issues is like “… going to school with all the best professors and then reporting to listeners what I found out at the end of the day … Can you believe they pay me to do that?”

Dimsdale began working for Marketplace in 1990, when he opened the D.C. bureau. The next day, Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait, triggering the first Gulf War, and Dimsdale has been busy ever since.

In his 20 years at Marketplace, Dimsdale has reported on two wars, the dot-com boom, the housing bust, healthcare reform and the greening of energy. His interviews with four U.S. Presidents, four Hall-of-Famers, broadcast journalist Walter Cronkite, computer scientist Sergey Brin, U.S. District Court Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson and former U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey stand out as favorites. Some of his greatest contributions include a series on government land-use policies and later, a series on the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste disposal site.

Before joining Marketplace, Dimsdale worked at NPR, the Pennsylvania Public Television Network, Post-Newsweek Stations and Independent Network News.

A native of Washington, D.C., and the son of a federal government employee, Dimsdale has been passionate about public policy since the Vietnam War. He holds a bachelor’s degree in International Studies from Washington College in Chestertown, Md., and a master’s degree in Broadcast Journalism from the University of Missouri in Columbia, Mo.

Dimsdale and his wife, Claire, live in the suburb of Silver Spring, Md., and when not working, he enjoys traveling, carpentry, photography, videography, swimming and home brewing.

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Features by John Dimsdale

Is N.H. representative for other American voters?

New Hampshire voters go to the polls in the state's all-important primary contest. The Republican presidential candidates have been campaigning in the Granite State for weeks and months.
Posted In: politics, New Hampshire, 2012 election

President Obama appoints new chief of staff

The President's budget director Jack Lew is taking over as chief of staff. He's replacing Bill Daley, who spent just a year on the job. What will this mean for White House relationships with big business?
Posted In: politics, Barack Obama, Washington D.C.

Excedrin, Gas-X and other Novartis drugs recalled

The Swiss drugmaker Novartis has just issued a recall of certain bottles of some very common over-the-counter drugs, including Excedrin, NoDoz, and Gas-X.
Posted In: Novartis, pharmaceuticals, recall

Shopping mall vacancies slowly declining

Vacancies at malls were down at the end of 2011, in part because new construction has stalled.
Posted In: Malls, shopping mall, retail sales, commercial real estate

Boeing to close large plant in Wichita

Boeing will close a military aircraft plant as President Obama and Defense Secretary Leon Panetta announce budget cuts.
Posted In: Boeing

Not many apartments available to rent

The vacancy rate for apartment fell to its lowest since 2001 in the fourth quarter as more people rented. But mortgage rates are also falling, so will people choose buying over renting soon?
Posted In: rent, rent vs. buy, Housing

Popular candidates in Iowa can’t count on donations

Rick Santorum is the latest GOP candidate to face the problem of increasing popularity without an increase in political dollars.
Posted In: 2012 election

NLRB board vacancies could stall major labor decisions

The National Labor Relations Board is about to lose the ability to enforce the nation's labor laws. On Dec. 31st, three of the five seats on the Board will become vacant. Without a quorum, the NLRB cannot decide cases.
Posted In: National Labor Relations Board, labor, politics

2011 in review: Washington's politics

Two words: Congressional gridlock.
Posted In: Congress, 2011

Mortgage lenders foot bill for payroll cut extension

Mortgage lenders will pay higher fees to Fannie and Freddie to guarantee their loans. That pays for the extension of the payroll tax cut.
Posted In: mortgage, payroll tax

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