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John Dimsdale has spent almost 40 years in radio. As head of Marketplace’s Washington, D.C., bureau, he provides insightful commentary on the intersection of government and money for the entire Marketplace portfolio.

As Dimsdale notes, “Sooner or later, every story in the world comes through Washington,” and reporting on those issues is like “… going to school with all the best professors and then reporting to listeners what I found out at the end of the day … Can you believe they pay me to do that?”

Dimsdale began working for Marketplace in 1990, when he opened the D.C. bureau. The next day, Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait, triggering the first Gulf War, and Dimsdale has been busy ever since.

In his 20 years at Marketplace, Dimsdale has reported on two wars, the dot-com boom, the housing bust, healthcare reform and the greening of energy. His interviews with four U.S. Presidents, four Hall-of-Famers, broadcast journalist Walter Cronkite, computer scientist Sergey Brin, U.S. District Court Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson and former U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey stand out as favorites. Some of his greatest contributions include a series on government land-use policies and later, a series on the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste disposal site.

Before joining Marketplace, Dimsdale worked at NPR, the Pennsylvania Public Television Network, Post-Newsweek Stations and Independent Network News.

A native of Washington, D.C., and the son of a federal government employee, Dimsdale has been passionate about public policy since the Vietnam War. He holds a bachelor’s degree in International Studies from Washington College in Chestertown, Md., and a master’s degree in Broadcast Journalism from the University of Missouri in Columbia, Mo.

Dimsdale and his wife, Claire, live in the suburb of Silver Spring, Md., and when not working, he enjoys traveling, carpentry, photography, videography, swimming and home brewing.

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Features by John Dimsdale

Senators get briefing on Dodd-Frank progress

Implementation of the financial industry overhaul is still a work in progress. More than half of the 400 new rules have missed their deadlines.
Posted In: dodd-frank, Dodd-Frank law

What's not getting done in Washington

There's a long list of legislative issues on hold. Blame the upcoming election.
Posted In: Congress, politics, partisan, legislation

Debt ceiling déjà vu

Last summer, the battle over raising the debt ceiling consumed D.C. And guess what -- new battle lines are being drawn again.
Posted In: debt ceiling

Businesses may lose census survey

The American Community Survey from the Census Bureau has been a useful business tool for decades. Washington budget-cutters want to ax it.
Posted In: census

Taking aim at the Census

You've probably never heard of the American Community Survey. It's on the cutting room floor in Congress. And businesses are not pleased.
Posted In: census

Innovation funding gets the ax

The Technology Innovation Program helped fund a lot of innovations, but now the program has been eliminated.
Posted In: technology, innovation

Banks try to adopt mortgage settlement rules

The big 49-state deal on mortgages was supposed to help clear the foreclosure backlog. So how are the banks faring now?
Posted In: Housing, Bank of America, mortgage settlement

Postal Service cancels rural closings

Bowing to pressure from unhappy customers and members of Congress, the U.S. Postal service will not close some 3,600 rural post offices.
Posted In: post office, U.S. Postal Service, mail

Fact checking the student loan debate

The latest Congressional fight is over how to deal with a student loan interest hike set for the summer. But what's the real bottom line?
Posted In: student loan

Congress begins budget battle over automatic cuts to Pentagon spending

Here's a phrase you'll begin to hear a lot in Congress: sequestered cuts. Today, the House begins debate on how to deal with the debt crisis.
Posted In: Congress, budget cuts, Pentagon

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