John Dimsdale has spent almost 40 years in radio. As head of Marketplace’s Washington, D.C., bureau, he provides insightful commentary on the intersection of government and money for the entire Marketplace portfolio.

As Dimsdale notes, “Sooner or later, every story in the world comes through Washington,” and reporting on those issues is like “… going to school with all the best professors and then reporting to listeners what I found out at the end of the day … Can you believe they pay me to do that?”

Dimsdale began working for Marketplace in 1990, when he opened the D.C. bureau. The next day, Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait, triggering the first Gulf War, and Dimsdale has been busy ever since.

In his 20 years at Marketplace, Dimsdale has reported on two wars, the dot-com boom, the housing bust, healthcare reform and the greening of energy. His interviews with four U.S. Presidents, four Hall-of-Famers, broadcast journalist Walter Cronkite, computer scientist Sergey Brin, U.S. District Court Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson and former U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey stand out as favorites. Some of his greatest contributions include a series on government land-use policies and later, a series on the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste disposal site.

Before joining Marketplace, Dimsdale worked at NPR, the Pennsylvania Public Television Network, Post-Newsweek Stations and Independent Network News.

A native of Washington, D.C., and the son of a federal government employee, Dimsdale has been passionate about public policy since the Vietnam War. He holds a bachelor’s degree in International Studies from Washington College in Chestertown, Md., and a master’s degree in Broadcast Journalism from the University of Missouri in Columbia, Mo.

Dimsdale and his wife, Claire, live in the suburb of Silver Spring, Md., and when not working, he enjoys traveling, carpentry, photography, videography, swimming and home brewing.

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Features by John Dimsdale

After rough year, Best Buy could go private

Best Buy, the big electronic warehouse store, may be going private. The store's founder and largest shareholder, Richard Schulze, is reportedly talking to Wall Street banks about a major restructuring of the company.
Posted In: Best Buy

Microsoft bets $1.2 billion on social networking for behind the firewall

Microsoft picks up Yammer to add business-friendly social networking software to its Office productivity software
Posted In: Microsoft, Yammer, social networking

The U.S. is not number one, according to data

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development says the U.S. is trailing in education and that our companies are no longer more innovative than other countries
Posted In: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)

New settlement comes out of Madoff Ponzi scandal

There's a new settlement related to the Bernie Madoff Ponzi scheme. It's about a money manager named Ezra Merkin, who has agreed to pay more than $400 million dollars to his former customers who lost billions when he invested their money with Madoff.
Posted In: Bernie Madoff, legal, settlement

With USPS cuts, mail would move more slowly

A "postal austerity" doesn't come without a cost to customers.
Posted In: Postal Service

Consumer bureau out with first list of complaints

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has made public the details of 137 complaints against credit card companies, but it's just a small fraction of the almost 17,000 such complaints the agency received.
Posted In: CFPB, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

'Big Sunscreen' wins delay in new FDA rules

Stricter regulations on what sunscreen packaging can say were supposed to go into effect today, just in time for summer. But a delay sought by the industry means they won't happen until the winter.
Posted In: lobbying, sunscreen, sunblock, Health, FDA

Consumer agency nears release of complaints

With few regulatory teeth and partisan fighting over its budget, the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau continues to carve out a role as a place people go to air financial grievances.
Posted In: CFPB, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

IMF says Chinese currency a little stronger

But experts say the yuan is still substantially undervalued against the U.S. dollar. And the change won't mean much improvement in the persistent U.S.-China trade imbalance.
Posted In: China, yuan, IMF

New push to ease student loan repayment

The federal government will streamline the process that borrowers use to get their payments capped at just 15 percent of their salaries.
Posted In: frederal student loans, student debt, student loan repayment options

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