Heidi N. Moore is The Guardian's U.S. finance and economics editor. She was formerly the New York bureau chief and Wall Street correspondent for Marketplace.

Prior to joining Marketplace, Moore was a reporter for the Wall Street Journal, where she was the lead writer for the paper’s award-winning Deal Journal online and daily newspaper column during the height (and depths) of the world financial crisis. In addition, she wrote an analysis of banks and mergers and broke news of SEC investigations, big acquisitions, and Barclays Capital buying most of Lehman Brothers out of bankruptcy.  Before that, she was U.S. Bureau Chief for London-based, Dow Jones-owned weekly newspaper and daily website, Financial News. For six years, she was a senior writer covering Wall Street banks and power brokers for The Deal magazine.

Moore’s articles on Wall Street banks and finance have been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, New York Magazine, Financial Times and Slate.  

Moore is a graduate of Columbia University and a native New Yorker. In her free time, Moore enjoys running and traveling.

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Features by Heidi N. Moore

Facebook stock price falls on day two of trading

The brand new stock in Facebook is down 11 percent right now to $33.11. If day one of trading was seen as a disappointment, day two is so far not winning many new friends at the social networking company.
Posted In: Facebook, IPO

The initial launch of the Facebook IPO

After opening later than expected, the first few hours of the Facebook IPO are suggesting that the company might have misjudged the value of its shares.
Posted In: Facebook, IPO, Mark Zuckerberg, shares

One of These Things Is Not Like the Others: Facebook Edition

Facebook, on the day of its somewhat rocky Internet debut at $38, traded in the range of $40 a share. This gave the company a market valuation of $112 billion. Few newborns emerge that size - and even fewer mature companies get there. Facebook is playing in the big leagues. Here's a list of the market values of some Very Important Companies that have been in business for decades. See how they compare to Facebook.

  • Google: Market value $200 billion; 2011 revenue $37.9 billion
  • JP Morgan Chase: Market value $127 billion; 2011 revenue $99.8 billion
  • Verizon: Market value $117 billion; 2011 revenue $110.9 billion 
  • Merck: Market value $115 billion; 2011 sales $48 billion
  • GlaxoSmithKline: $112 billion; 2011 sales $44 billion
  • Facebook: Market value $112 billion; 2011 revenue $3.7 billion
  • Anheuser-Busch: Market value $111 billion; 2011 revenue $39 billion
  • PepsiCo: Market value $109 billion; 2011 revenue $66.5 billion 
  • McDonald's: Market value $91 billion; 2011 revenue $27 billion
  • Cisco Systems: Market value $89 billion; 2011 sales $10.4 billion

Now, isn't that interesting?

One of These Things Is Not Like the Others: Facebook Edition

Facebook, on the day of its somewhat rocky Internet debut at $38, traded in the range of $40 a share. This gave the company a market valuation of $112 billion. Few newborns emerge that size - and even fewer mature companies get there. Facebook is playing in the big leagues. Here's a list of the market values of some Very Important Companies that have been in business for decades. See how they compare to Facebook.

  • Google: Market value $200 billion; 2011 revenue $37.9 billion
  • JP Morgan Chase: Market value $127 billion; 2011 revenue $99.8 billion
  • Verizon: Market value $117 billion; 2011 revenue $110.9 billion 
  • Merck: Market value $115 billion; 2011 sales $48 billion
  • GlaxoSmithKline: $112 billion; 2011 sales $44 billion
  • Facebook: Market value $112 billion; 2011 revenue $3.7 billion
  • Anheuser-Busch: Market value $111 billion; 2011 revenue $39 billion
  • PepsiCo: Market value $109 billion; 2011 revenue $66.5 billion 
  • McDonald's: Market value $91 billion; 2011 revenue $27 billion
  • Cisco Systems: Market value $89 billion; 2011 sales $10.4 billion

Now, isn't that interesting?

High schoolers to the rescue -- of Europe

Each year, high school freshmen and sophomores take part in the Euro Challenge, a competition to solve the eurozone's economic woes.
Posted In: Europe debt crisis

What Did JP Morgan Get Itself Into?

As more details emerge about JP Morgan's money-losing "London Whale" trade, the goalposts are moving fast and it's harder than ever to explain what's going on.
Posted In: London Whale, JP Morgan, Jamie Dimon, losses

As Facebook gets pricier, some pros skip IPO

Facebook raised its target share price for its IPO amid strong demand. But some professional investors see warning signs and have decided to skip.
Posted In: Facebook, IPO

The Art of Rubbing It In

For JP Morgan, pride goeth before the $2 billion trading fall - and schadenfreude from rivals comes after:

A huge portion of Wall Street's banking model is built around the idea of, 'I'm going to bet against my clients.'...and I see that and say, These are my clients! It's my job to make sure my client makes money, and know that I'll be rewarded for it.

That quote comes from Ed Clark, CEO of Toronto-Dominion Bank, or TD Bank, who revels in the description "old-fashioned banker."  He gave an interview to Bloomberg TV's Erik Schatzker in a piece on the risk-management superiority of our Canuck neighbors.

This kind of thing falls under the rubric of what CNN's Lizzie O'Leary sassily identified last week as "Dimonfreude." But it has perhaps a bit less impact when you count the Canadian government's "liquidity support" to their banks - $114 billion at the peak - as a plain old bailout.

JPMorgan's loss: More than a blip in the news cycle

New York bureau chief Heidi Moore discusses why JPMorgan's loss is a warning that suggests risky practices are taking place at other Wall Street banks.
Posted In: JPMorgan, Wall Street

No, Mr. Dimon, I Expect You to Die...of Mortification

You might recognize the line above from Goldfinger, in which Bond asks, "Do you expect me to talk?" -- only to get the searing reply, "No, Mr. Bond, I expect you to die."

This would work better as an arch metaphor, here, if there were such a thing as Death by Complex Derivatives. But, c'est la vie.

Talking - and the lack thereof - is likely to be a big subject tomorrow morning, when JP Morgan's shareholder meeting starts in Tampa, Florida.

The words from Jamie Dimon, JP Morgan's CEOs, should be as honeyed as possible. You know things are probably going to be bad when shareholders are girding their loins, which the Wall Street Journal fully expects them to do. And what are they girding for? Why, more official decapitations, of course. The heads set to roll this time - if one influential shareholder has its druthers - belong to Ellen Futter and James Crown, both members of the board of directors.

The shareholder group CtW Investment Group said it will send a letter Monday afternoon to J.P. Morgan's presiding director Lee Raymond and other board members calling for J.P. Morgan to replace James Crown as chairman of the board's Risk Policy Committee, and remove Ellen Futter, a director who is a member of the risk committee, according to the letter, which was reviewed in advance by The Wall Street Journal.

Given the players, perhaps Bond is the wrong hero. Perhaps this could be called The James Crown Affair.

Of course, more transparency is the goal. But only Mr. Dimon - who has admitted his knowledge of the extent of the losses is slim-- knows if he will remain purse-lipped in the face of shareholder questioning.

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