Eve Troeh is News Director at WWNO-FM in New Orleans, Louisiana, helping build the first public radio news department in the station’s 40-year history. She reported for the Marketplace Sustainability Desk from 2010 to 2013.

Troeh started at Marketplace in 2008 as part of the Marketplace Money production staff. Joining Marketplace’s sustainability desk in 2010, her first major assignment was attending the 2010 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Cancun, Mexico, an experience she called the best, and most rigorous, introduction to global sustainability issues. Troeh also filed stories from the Gulf of Mexico after the BP oil spill. 

Troeh enjoys her work as a radio reporter because it provides the opportunity to go behind the scenes, “Whether it’s a forgotten 19th century steam pipe system, international climate change negotiations, or a free-range hog farm, I get a thrill out of seeing how things work.”

Prior to Marketplace, Troeh worked as a freelance reporter in New Orleans, filing stories for the major public radio programs before and after Hurricane Katrina. She also served as an editor at the public radio music show American Routes.

Troeh holds undergraduate degrees in anthropology and journalism from the University of Southern California, and attended the University of Oslo as a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholar.

Originally from Juneau, Alaska, Troeh grew up in Sainte Genevieve, Mo., and now lives in New Orleans, La.

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Features by Eve Troeh

U.S. reliance on foreign oil is declining

The U.S. is importing less oil, and that will continue into next year. The Energy Information Administration expects the lowest oil import levels in 25 years.
Posted In: Oil, energy, import export

Silent hybrid cars to get a soundtrack

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is looking to pass a new rule that would require silent electric and hybrid cars to make more noise.
Posted In: Auto, auto industry, hybrid cars

Banks near $10 billion foreclosure settlement

The nation's major banks are reportedly close to a settlement with federal regulators over abusive foreclosure practices, going back to 2009.
Posted In: undefined

Ditched on the curb, old Christmas trees have a future

There are all sorts of ways to recycle Christmas trees: Mulch. Sand dune retainers. Even crappie fishermen get in on it.
Posted In: Christmas tree, recycling

The IRS in limbo as fiscal cliff debate continues

The IRS faces a ton of decisions, changes and updates in the fiscal cliff deals. But until there is a deal, the federal agency is as uncertain about the future as everyone else.
Posted In: fiscal cliff, Taxes, IRS

The delicate task of marketing 'green'

Take toilet paper -- please. People who don't automatically buy the greenest product available have to be persuaded toilet paper that's not white is just as good as what they're used to.
Posted In: green, green biz, Environment, environmental marketing claims

What today's longshoremen do

A strike by East Coast dockworkers has been put off at least 30 days. These union members are often highly skilled, and they're critical to vital bottlenecks of global trade: ports.
Posted In: ports, longshoremen, strike

Drought lowers Mississippi, holding up barge traffic

One stretch of the river is closed during the day so Army Corps of Engineers can blast away rock just below the low water.
Posted In: Mississippi River, drought, shipping

Recovery in new home sales a boost for the economy

Many of the new homes being sold now were planned years ago. Finally demand has returned, in part because first-time buyers are being outbid by investors for bargain foreclosure sales.
Posted In: Housing, home sales, construction

Wind power races to meet a year-end cut-off

A tax credit expires at the end of December. To earn it, wind farm operators have to have their turbines up, running and plugged in.
Posted In: wind, wind power, tax credit, energy

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