David Brancaccio

David Brancaccio is the host of American Public Media’s Marketplace Morning Report. Marketplace is the most popular business program in the United States.  His reporting focuses on the future of the economy,  financial and labor markets, technology, the environment and social enterprises. 

In the early 1990s, Brancaccio was Marketplace's European correspondent based in London, and he hosted Marketplace’s evening program from 1993 to 2003.  He co-anchored the PBS television news magazine program NOW with journalist Bill Moyers from 2003 to 2005, before taking over as the program's solo anchor in 2005. His feature-length documentary film, Fixing the Future, appeared in theaters nationwide in 2012.  Among his awards for broadcast journalism are the Peabody, the DuPont-Columbia, the Cronkite, and the Emmy.

Brancaccio has a bachelor's degree from Wesleyan University and a master's degree in journalism from Stanford University.  He has appeared on CBS, CNBC, MSNBC, and BBC World Service Television; his newspaper work has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, the Baltimore Sun, and Britain's The Guardian.  Brancaccio is author of the book Squandering Aimlessly, an exploration of how Americans apply their personal values to their money. His wife, Mary Brancaccio, is a poet and educator.  He grew up in Waterville, Maine, and also attended schools in Madagascar, Ghana, and Italy. His enjoys public speaking, bicycling and photography.

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Features by David Brancaccio

Retail numbers stay strong in March

Retail numbers faced their second month of strength in March, helped by the warm weather and the early Easter holiday.
Posted In: Retail, consumer

OpenTable facing competition from the Food Network

OpenTable is about to get some competition from the Food Network, in the form of their new site called CityEats.
Posted In: restaurants, Food, website, Food Network

Iceland could adopt the Canadian loonie

Iceland is looking to possibly adopt the Canadian currency. How would that work, and might that affect either country's economies?
Posted In: Iceland, Canada, currency

What really sank the Titanic

It wasn't just the iceberg. A new book explores all the different circumstances that led to the demise of the ship, including the ship's wrought iron rivets.
Posted In: titanic

In China, a prominent leader faces scandal

An ongoing story captivating China involves a man who was, until recently, a rising star within the ruling party, his spouse, and a British businessman who turn up dead in a Chinese hotel room. The wife is suspected of murder, her charismatic husband Bo Xilai is disgraced, his political power neutralized and now the investigation is reportedly looking into financial corruption.
Posted In: China, illegal

Court overturns political ad ban on public media shows

A federal appeals court in San Francisco has ruled that public radio and TV stations cannot be barred from running political messages. But does this mean public stations are about to get a flood of paid campaign messages?
Posted In: public radio, Political ads, media

Business booming for those who fortify homes

We hear a lot about the strain on the housing market -- but what about the barriers we put up to protect our homes?
Posted In: Housing, security

When people leaving their jobs is a good thing

The number of people signing up for unemployment benefits rose by 13,000 over the last week -- a surprise and not a good one. But more people voluntarily leaving their jobs can also be a good sign for the economy.
Posted In: Jobs, Unemployment

Changing the Washington, D.C. skyline

Leaders in Washington D.C. are talking about changing the current height regulations on buildings in the city.
Posted In: Washington D.C., architecture

'Marley' documentary to stream on Facebook while in theaters

Streaming Media's Dan Rayburn discusses the benefit of streaming a film on social networking sites at the same time as it's playing in theaters.
Posted In: streaming, movies, online

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