David Brancaccio is the host of Marketplace Morning Report.

In the early 1990s, Brancaccio was Marketplace’s European correspondent based in London, and hosted Marketplace from 1993 to 2003.  He co-anchored the PBS television news magazine program NOW with journalist Bill Moyers from 2003 to 2005, before taking over as the program’s solo anchor in 2005.  He also hosted public television’s California Connected and hosted a series of long-form public radio documentaries on international affairs produced by the Stanley Foundation. He served as special correspondent for Marketplace’s Economy 4.0 series, which focused on in-depth reporting on ways to make the economy better serve more people.  Most recently, Brancaccio hosted Marketplace Tech, Marketplace's daily technology program. 

Brancaccio specializes in telling stories important to our economy and our democracy through the eyes of the real people who live in the cross hairs of crucial issues. His accessible yet authoritative approach to investigative reporting and in-depth interviewing earned his work the highest honors in broadcast journalism, including the Peabody, the Columbia-duPont, the Emmy, and the Walter Cronkite awards.

A new version of Brancaccio's public television special about Main Street as an engine of economic innovation called Fixing the Future will soon be a feature-length documentary.  He is author of a book about Americans applying their personal values to their money, entitled Squandering Aimlessly.  

Brancaccio has a bachelor's degree from Wesleyan University and a master's degree in journalism from Stanford University.  He has appeared on CNBC, MSNBC, and BBC television and his newspaper work has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, the Baltimore Sun, and Britain’s The Guardian.  Brancaccio is an avid bicyclist and photographer and a very proud father of three.

Press and media requests for interviews, media appearances and live appearances should be sent to communications@marketplace.org.

 

Features By David Brancaccio

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The psychology behind Greg Smith's op-ed

What kind of emotions and thoughts lie behind a high-profile resignation?
Posted In: mid-day extra, Goldman Sachs, psychology, corporate
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What to take away from the Fed's stress tests

Probing deeper into the cracks that emerged when the Federal Reserve did the torture test on banks, it's tough to get past the few that did not make the grade.
Posted In: stress tests, banking
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Furniture sales growth strongest since 2000

Furniture sales last month were 8.3 percent higher than a year earlier, and that could mean good news for the overall economy.
Posted In: furniture, sales, Housing
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U.S. challenges China in WTO over rare earth restrictions

The Obama administration is taking China to the World Trade Organization saying it's not playing fair with those crucial raw materials.
Posted In: China, rare earth minerals
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U.S., EU and Japan protesting China's rare earth policy

It takes a lot of what are called rare earths to make the electronics that keep us going in the 21st century. The Obama Administration believes China is holding back its supply of these special metals to drive up prices and now the U.S. , the European Union, and Japan are taking their beef about China to the World Trade Organization.
Posted In: rare earth minerals, China, Barack Obama, WTO
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The first step to merger: Buying domain names?

U.S. Airways is reportedly interested in a possible merger-type deal with American Airlines' parent company, AMR Corp. One way it is showing its affection? Buying up domain names.
Posted In: domain names, US Airways, airline industry, Mergers and Acquisitions
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What the Federal Reserve has left in its arsenal

What more can the Federal Reserve do to help boost the American economy?
Posted In: Federal Reserve, interest rates, Operation Twist
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Many pushing back against EU carbon tax

Europe's biggest airlines say a new European tax on the carbon dioxide coming out their jet engines is a bad idea.
Posted In: carbon tax, European Union, Airlines
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The growth of the genetic testing industry

A new study that predicts that Americans could be spending $25 billion a year by the end of this decade on genetics testing. It's believed that the prospect of being able to sequence whole genomes at an affordable cost now is really a gamechanger.
Posted In: Health, genetics, disease
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Building skyscrapers at record speed

A new 30 story building in China went up in just two weeks. How is this possible and more importantly, how can it be safe?
Posted In: skyscraper, China

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