Ben Johnson started his career in journalism in 2003, working as a features and general assignment reporter for The Day newspaper in New London, Connecticut. While there he won a regional award for feature writing, and was recruited to write a weekly entertainment column for the Tribune Media Service wire service.

In 2006, Ben relocated to New York City to be an entertainment and music reporter at the Staten Island Advance newspaper, where he soon moved into hard news, working the cops beat and as a weekend city desk editor. In 2010, he began to work as a freelance web producer at The Takeaway, a national radio show produced out of New York's WNYC Radio in partnership with WGBH, the New York Times and the BBC.

Ben went on to be a freelance radio producer at WNYC, serving as the digital editor for The Takeaway while also doing live and features reporting for the station on everything from Occupy Wall Street to New York's last functioning ship graveyard. While working at WNYC, Ben started blogging for Slate Magazine's breaking news blog, The Slatest.

In 2012, Ben left WNYC to manage a partnership between Slate and YouTube, producing daily breaking news videos and other content for SlateV, the magazine's video department. He also wrote regularly for Slate's Future Tense blog and drew the extreme ire of his fellow Radiohead fans by asking the band to stop touring

In summer 2012 Ben joined Marketplace to relaunch and produce the Tech Report, now called Marketplace Tech. When David Brancaccio became the host of Marketplace Morning Report in 2013, Ben started hosting Marketplace Tech and was hired officially as host in early 2014.

He doesn't like to brag about it but over the years, Ben has interviewed Jay-Z, Hillary Rodham Clinton, Luciano Pavarotti, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, Josh Homme, Biz Stone, Guy Kawasaki, Col. Chris Hadfield, Neil deGrasse Tyson and Neil Young. Ben enjoys and engages in 80s movie references, pie baking, and high-fives. His Twitter feed has never been polluted by a subtweet. His interest in swimming knows no bounds, especially if there is a high-dive and a high-five involved. 

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Features by Ben Johnson

The first 3D printed gun goes bang

The world's first gun made almost entirely on a 3D printer has been fired in the United States. Cody Wilson, a Texas law student, has been working on the project for over a year.
Posted In: 3D printing, guns, gun control

The Root launches black Twitter aggregator 'The Chatterati'

Online magazine The Root has just launched 'The Chatterati', a new webpage that watches Twitter users, phrases and hashtags trending in the black community.
Posted In: Twitter, African-American, Internet, media

3D printers: Now available with a click of the 'Easy Button'

Has 3D printing finally gone mainstream? Staples says it will start carrying the Cube 3D printer made by 3D Systems.
Posted In: 3D printing, staples

Who do you trust more with your free speech: The government or tech companies?

A secret meeting, a handful of tech CEO's, and the future of your freedom of speech online.
Posted In: free speech, Tech, Google, Facebook, censorship

Obama nominates former lobbyist, hall-of-famer Wheeler to head FCC

The Federal Communications Commission has a new chairman, Tom Wheeler. If confirmed by the Senate, he'll replace Julius Genachowski, who resigned in March.
Posted In: fcc, Obama, telecom

Fisheye lens gets a bug-eye makeover

Researchers at the University of Illinois and Northwestern University have developed a unique hemispherical digital camera based on the eye of a fly.

What Foxconn profits can tell us about Apple

Apple and Samsung both reported quarterly earnings last week. Today we hear from the company that makes many of the gadgets they sell -- Taiwanese tech giant Hon Hai, or as we know it, Foxconn.
Posted In: apple, Foxconn, iPhone

Bundling no more? Netflix, Hopper chip away at traditional TV

The TV industry is changing fast -- and one of its pillars, bundling, may be about to fall.
Posted In: tv, Tech, netflix

Burner mobile app goes beyond prank calls

Prank calls -- which in 2013 are all but rooted out with caller ID -- may get new life with a new app called Burner. But the software may have legitimate privacy uses as well.
Posted In: android, mobile apps, privacy

American Airlines stuck on the tarmac over systems glitch

Computer glitches can be frustrating, but what about when they keep an entire airline company from taking off? That’s what happened yesterday, when American Airlines had to cancel over 400 flights.
Posted In: American Airlines, cloud

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