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Amy Scott is Marketplace’s education correspondent. In addition to covering the K-12 and higher education beats, she files general business and economic stories for Marketplace programs and marketplace.org, drawing from her experience covering finance in New York.

Scott joined Marketplace as a production assistant in September 2001, moving in 2002 to Washington, D.C., as a staff reporter. From 2003 to 2010, she reported from Marketplace’s New York bureau, focusing on the culture of Wall Street, and becoming bureau chief in 2008. In addition to leading Marketplace’s New York coverage of the financial crisis, Scott hit the road for two cross-country trips, exploring how Americans experienced the fallout. In 2008, she produced stories for Marketplace’s remote broadcasts from Egypt and Dubai for the Middle East @ Work series. In 2009, she spent a month reporting in Germany as a McCloy Fellow. She is now based in Baltimore.

In 2012 Scott and Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz won a national Edward R. Murrow award for their investigation of agencies that place Chinese students in U.S. colleges. Their work also won first prize for investigative reporting from the Education Writers Association. Other honors include a 2010 National Headliner Award and a special citation from the Education Writers Association for an investigation of recruiting abuses at the University of Phoenix, co-reported with Sharona Coutts of ProPublica. The stories led U.S. Representative Elijah Cummings to call for hearings on the conduct of for-profit colleges in the United States. Scott also won a Gracie Allen Award for feature reporting in 2006.

Before joining Marketplace, Scott worked as a reporter in Dillingham, Alaska, home to the world’s largest wild sockeye salmon run. She spends much of her free time exploring Maryland’s hiking trails or playing various musical instruments. She is a long-time student and performer of Javanese gamelan music.

A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Scott has a bachelor’s degree in history from Grinnell College and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley, where she studied documentary filmmaking.

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Features by Amy Scott

Culinary Institute of America students turn up the heat, walk out because of falling standards

Students at Culinary Institute of America, one of the nation's top cooking schools, say their degrees are being devalued by slipping standards.
Posted In: Culinary institute of america, protests, cooking

States push to tie university funding to better performance

California Governor Jerry Brown is looking to join other states in basing funding increases at public universities on measures like higher graduation rates.
Posted In: higher education, california, Jerry Brown

What DeVry's earnings say about the for-profit college business

As for-profit colleges learn to survive with fewer students, the rise of free online courses raises new questions.
Posted In: Education, DeVry, online education

No classes needed: Southern New Hampshire University emphasizes skills

Students at Southern New Hampshire University can now receive federal financial aid for a "self-paced online program" with no traditional courses or professors. It’s all about mastering competencies. Will it work?
Posted In: online education, Southern New Hampshire University, online degrees

Digital library launches without Boston celebration

The Digital Public Library of America goes online today, with 2.4 million pieces of art and history.
Posted In: library, digital, boston

Amazon nabs bigger share of music downloads (poll)

iTunes still dominates the music download arena, but Amazon is coming on, and other competitors are in the wings.
Posted In: Amazon, apple, itunes, Music

One student's path from Oyler to college

The high school senior will be the first in her family to graduate high school, but she's got her eyes on an even bigger prize.
Posted In: Oyler School

Incentivizing cheating: Can we learn from Atlanta?

Key figures in the Atlanta school cheating scandal admit to the practice, but did we learn anything about incentives?
Posted In: Education, teachers, cheating, testing

Forget tuition, just applying to college can cost thousands

April 1 is the deadline for most colleges and universities to let applicants know whether they've been accepted -- or not. Already, families have spent thousands on the process.
Posted In: Education, college, college finances, college admissions

Oyler principal on the budget bubble?

Craig Hockenberry has been the guiding force at Oyler School for more than a decade. But cuts could threaten his job.
Posted In: Oyler School, teachers

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