Amy Scott is Marketplace’s education correspondent. In addition to covering the K-12 and higher education beats, she files general business and economic stories for Marketplace programs and marketplace.org, drawing from her experience covering finance in New York.

Scott joined Marketplace as a production assistant in September 2001, moving in 2002 to Washington, D.C., as a staff reporter. From 2003 to 2010, she reported from Marketplace’s New York bureau, focusing on the culture of Wall Street, and becoming bureau chief in 2008. In addition to leading Marketplace’s New York coverage of the financial crisis, Scott hit the road for two cross-country trips, exploring how Americans experienced the fallout. In 2008, she produced stories for Marketplace’s remote broadcasts from Egypt and Dubai for the Middle East @ Work series. In 2009, she spent a month reporting in Germany as a McCloy Fellow. She is now based in Baltimore.

In 2012 Scott and Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz won a national Edward R. Murrow award for their investigation of agencies that place Chinese students in U.S. colleges. Their work also won first prize for investigative reporting from the Education Writers Association. Other honors include a 2010 National Headliner Award and a special citation from the Education Writers Association for an investigation of recruiting abuses at the University of Phoenix, co-reported with Sharona Coutts of ProPublica. The stories led U.S. Representative Elijah Cummings to call for hearings on the conduct of for-profit colleges in the United States. Scott also won a Gracie Allen Award for feature reporting in 2006.

Before joining Marketplace, Scott worked as a reporter in Dillingham, Alaska, home to the world’s largest wild sockeye salmon run. She spends much of her free time exploring Maryland’s hiking trails or playing various musical instruments. She is a long-time student and performer of Javanese gamelan music.

A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Scott has a bachelor’s degree in history from Grinnell College and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley, where she studied documentary filmmaking.

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Features by Amy Scott

Quiz: How well do you know your SAT vocabulary?

A new test was announced today with big changes to the verbal section.
Posted In: SAT, college board

Which schools will win the college tuition battle?

Some schools set tuition high, while others try a lower approach.
Posted In: college tuition, Tuition, universities, applying to college, student life, students

Why the Comcast-Time Warner deal would mean layoffs

Comcast says a merger with Time Warner Cable will create about $1.5 billion in "operating efficiencies." Translation: layoffs are coming.
Posted In: Comcast, Time Warner Cable

College philanthropy hits new high

Donations to higher ed reached $33.8 billion in 2013.
Posted In: philanthropy, colleges, universities

Navigating the many firsts of freshman year

Going away to school is an adjustment for nearly every student, but when you're the first in your family to go, the transition can be even harder
Posted In: higher education, college, first-generation college students

A different way to pay for college

A proposal to waive tuition at public universities, but grads will have to "pay it forward."
Posted In: Oregon, Bonamici, college

Obama reboots call for universal pre-K

The President led the address with an unnamed teacher, touting the highest graduation rate in more than three decades, but delivered few new education initiatives in the address. He called for an "across-the-board reform" of job training programs, to be led by Vice President Joe Biden. He repeated last year’s proposal for universal access to pre-Kindergarten for the country’s four-year-olds, plugging a new "Race to the Top" competition for early education.

"As Congress decides what it’s going to do," he pledged to work with a coalition of elected officials, business leaders and philanthropists to increase access to high-quality pre-K. 

The president also announced a partnership with companies like Apple, Microsoft, Sprint, and Verizon to connect more than 15,000 schools to high-speed broadband. There were nods to recent efforts to make college more affordable, like the income-based repayment plan that caps student loan payments at 10 percent of income and better information for parents about college costs.

But overall, no dramatic new proposals.

Trouble for the Common Core

New York teachers have come out swinging against the Common Core. What's next for the controversial curriculum standards?
Posted In: Education, common core

Court ruling could clear up some Obamacare confusion

A new study says more than half of Americans are fuzzy on the deadline for signing up for health insurance.
Posted In: Obamacare, ACA

Super Bowl commercials get their own commercials

Advertisers are ginning up attention for their spots with teasers long before the big game.
Posted In: ads, Super Bowl

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