Amy Scott is Marketplace’s education correspondent. In addition to covering the K-12 and higher education beats, she files general business and economic stories for Marketplace programs and marketplace.org, drawing from her experience covering finance in New York.

Scott joined Marketplace as a production assistant in September 2001, moving in 2002 to Washington, D.C., as a staff reporter. From 2003 to 2010, she reported from Marketplace’s New York bureau, focusing on the culture of Wall Street, and becoming bureau chief in 2008. In addition to leading Marketplace’s New York coverage of the financial crisis, Scott hit the road for two cross-country trips, exploring how Americans experienced the fallout. In 2008, she produced stories for Marketplace’s remote broadcasts from Egypt and Dubai for the Middle East @ Work series. In 2009, she spent a month reporting in Germany as a McCloy Fellow. She is now based in Baltimore.

In 2012 Scott and Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz won a national Edward R. Murrow award for their investigation of agencies that place Chinese students in U.S. colleges. Their work also won first prize for investigative reporting from the Education Writers Association. Other honors include a 2010 National Headliner Award and a special citation from the Education Writers Association for an investigation of recruiting abuses at the University of Phoenix, co-reported with Sharona Coutts of ProPublica. The stories led U.S. Representative Elijah Cummings to call for hearings on the conduct of for-profit colleges in the United States. Scott also won a Gracie Allen Award for feature reporting in 2006.

Before joining Marketplace, Scott worked as a reporter in Dillingham, Alaska, home to the world’s largest wild sockeye salmon run. She spends much of her free time exploring Maryland’s hiking trails or playing various musical instruments. She is a long-time student and performer of Javanese gamelan music.

A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Scott has a bachelor’s degree in history from Grinnell College and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley, where she studied documentary filmmaking.

Features By Amy Scott

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SEC looking into mutual fund kickbacks

Securities regulators are investigating 27 investment advisory companies for allegedly misusing shareholder money. Amy Scott reports.
Posted In: Wall Street, Washington
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Stock tip spam scam

Does it seem like you've been getting a lot of e-mails promising hot new stock tips lately? You're probably going to see more and more of this spam filling up your inbox — because it's working. Amy Scott reports.
Posted In: Wall Street
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Putting the Taurus out to pasture

After more than 20 years, Ford is retiring the "jelly bean"-shaped car that helped the automaker rebound from its previous sales slump. Amy Scott reports.
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Feathers flying at NBC

NBC Universal will cut 700 jobs and slash around $750 million in operating expenses before the end of next year. Sluggish ad sales and viewership are to blame, Amy Scott reports.
Posted In: Entertainment
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All's <i>very</i> well on Wall Street

Wall Street workers were paid close to $300,000 last year on average, and securities firms like Goldman Sachs and Merrill Lynch are turning $3 billion quarterly profits. Amy Scott reports on the banking boom.
Posted In: Wall Street
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Credit Suisse loses $120 million

Derivatives are risky. They're bets basically &mdash; an easy way to lose money. There's word today that Switzerland's second largest bank lost a whole lot on a bad bet in South Korea. Amy Scott reports.
Posted In: Canada
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Security Council to consider North Korea sanctions

The U.S. brought a stiff resolution on North Korea sanctions to the U.N. Security Council. What it'll look like when it comes out the other end is anybody's guess. Amy Scott reports.
Posted In: Canada
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Housing prices vs. costly commutes

Would you choose a cheaper house if you knew you'd have to pay more to get to work? A new study suggests that's a choice most low-income families have to make &mdash; and transportation costs add up fast. Amy Scott reports.
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Subsidies favor big farms

A new study finds the lion's share of federal money that supports farm subsidies and research is going to big farms. That could leave small and medium-sized operations out in the cold, Amy Scott reports.
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Dolans want Cablevision off the market

The family that controls Cablevision is trying to take the company private again. Their last attempt failed, but this time the Dolans are back with a higher offer and a simpler plan. Amy Scott reports.

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