Alex Chadwick is an independent journalist and renowned public radio correspondent, host and program developer. His distinctive work made him one of NPR’s most recognized voices during his long career there. Among other achievements, he was part of the creative team that developed and launched Morning Edition, the most successful program in NPR’s history. As a feature reporter and host of Morning Edition, he helped create the partnership with National Geographic that led to the enormously popular Radio Expeditions series. Called ‘the best writer at NPR,’ he has scripted award-winning documentaries for National Geographic Television, ABC and CBS. His original online production, Interviews 50 Cents (NYT.com  ‘must see’ video), was a long-running popular feature at SlateV.com . Chadwick is the recipient of multiple awards including the Dupont-Columbia for Radio Expeditions, 2000; Society for Professional Journalists, Investigative Reporting, 2001 and Overseas Press Club Lowell Thomas Award, 1988 and 1990.  

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Features by Alex Chadwick

Miami's flooded future

Miami is one of the cities most threatened by climate change. Will it be able to adapt in time?
Posted In: climate change, Florida, flooding, king tides

This smart grid can save power -- and lives

The U.S. power grid needs upgrading to manage all the stresses on it. The Army is testing a much smaller grid that cut fuel use in half, saving soldiers' lives.
Posted In: power grid, smart grid, electricity

Today's Army marches on its batteries while searching for alternatives

The Rapid Equipping Force seeks solutions to problems soldiers encounter in the field -- such as packing pounds and pounds of batteries on patrol.
Posted In: energy, military, batteries, Army

Japan's lesson for U.S. reactors: Disaster is possible

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission studied the disaster at the Fukushima reactors for a year. Now it's voting on an expensive safety modification to 31 similar reactors in the U.S.
Posted In: nuclear energy, nuclear, Fukushima

Innovators: Building an electric car for speed

Mike Pethel has pieced together what may be the fastest electric car anywhere, using two DC motors and enough batteries to power 750 homes.
Posted In: electric cars

Scientific method: The search for a better battery

The biggest barrier to renewable energy such as solar and wind is storing the electricity it generates. In a university laboratory, a scientist painstakingly re-imagines the battery.
Posted In: batteries, energy, fossil fuels

This is the oil business

Oil doesn't come from a gas pump, it comes from modern-day prospectors who depend on data ... and luck.
Posted In: Oil, oil drilling

What happened to the oil from the BP spill?

2010's Gulf oil spill put almost 5 million barrels of oil in the Gulf of Mexico. Where did it all go?
Posted In: bp oil spill, Gulf of Mexico, Gulf oil spill

Lessons from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster

New tapes from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Emergency Operations Center show how the disaster and American reaction unfolded.
Posted In: Fukushima, Japan, nuclear power, emergency

Interview: Witness at Fukushima Daiichi

American nuclear worker Carl Pillitteri relives the earthquake and tsunami that precipitated the meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, where he was on site to see the destruction.
Posted In: Fukushima, earthquake, nuclear energy, interview, Japan

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