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The Numbers for Monday, December 23: Popular smartphones

42 million

The number of iPhones already on China Mobile's network, even though the mobile phone network -- China's largest -- only today announced a deal with Apple to begin officially selling iPhones. The deal will officially make the iPhone available to 760 million network subscribers in China, giving Apple a foothold in a smartphone market that until now has been dominated by Android variants. (Forbes)

52 %

The percentage of porn that is now consumed on mobile devices, according to an industry aggregator, indicating that the majority of viewers in the U.S. may now be getting their fix via smartphones. The stats are telling of Americans' general internet usage, as the habits of porn consumers have long mirrored larger web trends. (readwrite)


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Dec 23, 2013

Another Christmas, another year of rising prices

Dec 2, 2013
Twelve drummers drumming, six geese-a-laying and one partridge in a pear tree. What does it all add up to?
Posted In: Christmas, gifts, investments, inflation

5 trends - including TV dinners - spawned by Thanksgiving

Nov 28, 2013
Turkey, Black Friday, and ... TV dinners? Here are a few parts of the economy that wouldn't be the same without Thanksgiving.
Posted In: Thanksgiving

The Numbers for Tuesday, November 26: Beer!

1/2

The container size, in gallons, that brewers in Florida are forbidden by law to sell their beer in when customers want to fill their "growlers," despite being able to sell both larger and smaller containers. While brewers in the state can sell quart and gallon sized containers, half-gallon growlers are considered standard across the rest of the craft beer community. (News Observer)

15 %

The ownership stake Molson Coors has held in MLB's Colorado Rockies, until now. The Colorado-based beer company announced it will sell its share of the team to Arizona developer Jay Stein. Coors has had an equity ownership in the club since the team’s inception in 1991. The name of the team's stadium -- Coors Field -- will stay the same, though. (Sports Business Daily)


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Nov 26, 2013

The Numbers for Monday, November 25: China!

160 million

The number of viewers the popular BBC drama Downton Abbey has in China, according to remarks by Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne on a recent trade trip to Beijing. The right to sell merchandise to those viewers won't go to the show's producers, though, or even any British company. (Marketplace)

1.1 million

The number of hopeful students in China who are gearing up to take the country's civil service exams for a chance at a stable and comfortable government post. Nicknamed the "Golden rice bowl," the tradition dates back more than 1,300 years to tests that ancient imperial governments would hold to select bureaucrats from the country's scholars. (CNN)

7

The area, in square kilometers, of the disputed, uninhabited islands over which China announced the creation of the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone. Despite condemnation from Japan and the U.S., Asian airlines have announced they will comply with rules to report flight paths through the territory. (Reuters)


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Nov 25, 2013

The Numbers for Thursday, November 21: Driving to the future

3,300

The approximate number of vehicle-related deaths last year that involved distracted driving, according to data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. That number has automakers slow to integrate apps and smartphone technology into their cars, as they wait for developers to reach a common standard for safe interfaces. (The Los Angeles Times)

$3

The cost of the hydrogen needed to needed to power a fuel-cell car the same distance as a gallon of gasoline. At auto shows in Los Angeles and Tokyo, car companies are debuting hydrogen-powered vehicles that exhaust only water vapor. Hyundai Motor Co. will be the first to the mass market in the U.S. with a Tuscon SUV available for lease in Los Angeles in 2015. (The Washington Post)

99

The score, out of 100, that consumers gave the Tesla Model S on Consumer Reports' annual owner satisfaction score. The near-perfect assessment, which the magazine says is the best it has seen in years, comes despite three high-profile vehicle fires occurring in Tesla's flagship car that have marred the electric vehicle's otherwise stellar public image and caused a 30 percent drop in the company's stock price. (Consumer Reports)


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Nov 21, 2013

PS4 and the history of lavish gaming system parties

Nov 15, 2013
With the Playstation 4 released and Xbox One not far behind, a look back at past video game launches.
Posted In: Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Sony, Microsoft

The Numbers for Friday, November 15: Environmentally-friendly

6

The number of tons of confiscated elephant ivory that U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services destroyed on Thursday, a move that wildlife groups says sends a message to criminal traffickers that the ivory is worthless. The stockpile was accumulated over 25 years of seizures and undercover investigations that prevented the ivory from being sold illegally in the U.S. or overseas. (Yahoo! Finance)

$80 million

Google's investment into six solar energy plants in California and Arizona that the company expects to power 17,000 homes in the United States. So far, the company has put more than $1 billion into solar and wind projects since 2010. (Mashable)

$484 million

The amount it's going to cost private trash haulers in New York to comply with the city's new emissions standards for the fleets of trucks that collect refuse. According to a new law signed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, by 2017 at least 90 percent of the city's own diesel-powered trash truck must meet the tougher standards, while private haulers have three years on top of that to do the same. (NYT)


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Nov 15, 2013

The Numbers for Thursday, November 14: We're not dead yet

1,500

The number of refurbished typewriters one company sells every year from their website, typewriters.com, proving that there is still some demand for the seemingly outdated technology. The electronic business typewriters remain favored by law offices, funeral parlors, and anybody else who has to fill out lots of forms or make labels. (Marketplace)

$60 billion

Google's expected revenue this year, most of which comes from advertising sales, and as Business Insider CEO Henry Blodget points out, makes the company bigger than either the newspaper or magazine industries in the U.S. for the first time. (Business Insider)

$60,000

The annual income that ride-sharing service Uber has been saying drivers in LA could make by participating in the service; that's double what many cab drivers in the area make. Ever since states like California legalized the services earlier this year, taxi companies, burdened with more regulations, have been looking for ways to compete, including sending drivers to customer service lessons. (Southern California Public Radio)


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Nov 14, 2013

The Numbers for Wednesday, November 13: Artsy business

 

$142.2 million

The amount Francis Bacon's 1969 " Three Studies of Lucian Freud" was auctioned off for at a sale at Christie's, the most ever paid for a work of art. The previous record was held by Edvard Munch's "The Scream," which went for $119.9 million in 2012. The record could possibly be broken again tonight, when Andy Warhol's 1963 painting "Silver Car Crash (Double Disaster)" hits the auction block at Sotheby's in New York. (Marketplace)

$1 billion

The total value of a cache of 1,406 artworks found last year in in the Munich apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, son of a Nazi art dealer. The German government began publishing details of the artworks in the hoard this week that may have been seized by the Nazis or lost by Jewish collectors in forced sales. Families of the artworks' previous owners are working with authorities to see the paintings returned, but the incident has raised questions about whether more art lost during the Holocaust still resides in private collections. (Bloomberg)

$0

The amount one group of Romanian art thieves made off of their heist last year of two drawings by Monet and one painting each by Gauguin, Picasso, Matisse, Lucian Freud and Jacob Meyer de Haan from a Rotterdam museum. Speculation in the press initially had valued the stolen works at around $400 million, but the high-profile nature of the theft made the paintings and drawings impossible to sell, at least for the criminals inexperienced in the black market of stolen art. (The New York Times)


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Nov 13, 2013

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