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Kabul's entry into high-end communications

Nov 29, 2004
Our final advice to America: make a choice on how to treat the Muslim world. That's the highlight of a new videotape broadcast on Al-Jazeera today. It was delivered by a man in a white turban with an automatic rifle, believed to be Al Qaida's number two. As the manhunt continues in the mountainous west, to the east n places like Kabul - the focus is on reconstruction. As Jason Paur reports, all this activity has led the local business community to discover the virtues of letting one's fingers do the walking.
Posted In: Canada

Sloan Sessions - pension problems

Nov 29, 2004
Newsweek magazine's Wall Street editor Allan Sloan discusses the plight of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation. It's $23 billion in the hole, which is bad news if you're counting on the PBGC to back your pension.

Go midwest, young man ...

Nov 29, 2004
Universities in California are preparing for a tidal wave of students. Baby boomer children are fueling college enrollment, but there's only so much room. At the same time, the state is cutting education spending and programs to balance its budget. The answer for some students is to leave California, and go to the Midwest instead. South Dakota Public Radio's Curt Nickisch has the story.

Ukraine's political quagmire

Nov 26, 2004
The crisis in Ukraine continues. In Kiev tens of thousands of demonstraters are still protesting the disputed presidential election. They claim that the pro-Moscow candidate - the current Prime Minister - rigged the ballot. Ukraine's president Leonid Kuchma announced the creation of a multilateral working group to figure out a solution. The U.S. and the European Union have condemned the election. But Russian President Vladimir Putin welcomed the result. As Stephen Beard reports, this is turning into a test of Russia's democracy and free market reform.
Posted In: Canada

That Disney thing ...

Nov 26, 2004
The man who spent years negotiating peace talks in Northern Ireland took the stand this week in a made-for-TV court case involving two of Hollywood's biggest power brokers and the shareholders who are very angry with them. Former U.S. Senator George Mitchell is now the chairman of Disney. He testified that it was best for Michael Ovitz to be fired from his job as Disney president in 1996 by his friend and current Disney CEO Michael Eisner. Stockholders are suing Disney and the board over the $140 million severance package given to Ovitz. Janet Shprintz covers Hollywood and law for Variety...

The week on Wall Street

Nov 26, 2004
Host Tess Vigeland catches up with Dallas stockbroker David Johnson about the week on Wall Street.

Survival debt

Nov 26, 2004
It's practically an American tradition to pay for holiday gifts, parties and splurges with plastic. Perhaps it wouldn't be so bad if credit card debt only happened once a year. But collectively we owe $2.05 trillion. And now Americans are getting in even deeper. It's called survival debt. Commentator M.P. Dunleavey explains.

Black Friday is upon us

Nov 26, 2004
There's a reason Santa Claus brings up the rear of the Thanksgiving Day parade. It's a not-so-subtle sign that as soon as you've digested the turkey, it's time to sink your teeth into some shopping. Today's unofficial start of the shopping season is known as Black Friday, but before the holidays are over, many people wind up in the red. Americans, it seems, can't help it.

Saving the small stores

Nov 26, 2004
Big retail chains wiping out Mom and Pop stores isn't just an American phenomenon. It's happening in other parts of the world, too - even in Europe, where small grocery markets have been the tradition for generations. One man in Italy is trying a unique method to save the small town stores. He wants the big guys to "adopt" them. Marketplace's Megan Williams reports from the Italian province of Verase.

The rising cost of living

Nov 25, 2004
In advance of the holiday and the start of the big shopping season, a veritable feast of figures on Wednesday. Orders for big ticket durable goods slipped a bit, but new home sales rose, consumer sentiment brightened and claims for jobless aid fell more than expected. But even if you're thankful to have a steady job right now, it doesn't necessarily mean you're in the clear. In many cities, some jobs that pay well above the minimum wage don't cover the basics. Ed Ungar reports from the Pacific Northwest.

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