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Spending the aid ...

Jan 5, 2005
Governments around the world have pledged more than $3 billion to help the victims of the Asian tsunami. How to spend that money? That's on the table tomorrow - at an international summit in Jakarta. Also on the agenda is a British plan for debt relief. From London, Marketplace's Stephen Beard reports.

Dealing with dirty bombs

Jan 5, 2005
Tomorrow the Department of Homeland Security will announce a National Response Plan -- guidelines for the wake of nuclear or biological attack. The Department is also working out a response to a dirty bomb. If a terrorist got some radiological material - cobalt 60 is in thousands of hospitals-- it wouldn't take much know-how to make a device that could spread radioactive particles for miles. From the Health Desk at WGBH, Helen Palmer reports what at issue is how much cleanup a dirty bomb would require -- and what that would cost.

A time for giving

Jan 5, 2005
Americans from all walks of life are pledging money to help the tsunami victims. Two former Presidents, Bill Clinton and George Bush Senior are heading up an effort to spur even more giving. The current President Bush says private donors should be the focus of America's disaster contributions. But in this edition of "The Public's Business", commentator Robert Reich says the government should think about giving more.

Getting out the vote

Jan 5, 2005
This weekend, Palestinians go to the polls to elect a replacement for the late Yasser Arafat. There's been lots of rhetoric during the campaign about the conflict with Israel and the security of the Palestinian people. But as correspondent Adam Davidson discovered, many voters have another issue on their minds. Just like in U.S. elections, it's the economy.

More Tort reform!

Jan 4, 2005
Tomorrow, President Bush will be giving a speech in Madison County, Illinois. Madison County - there are so many medical malpractice suits filed there, the place has won a nickname from supporters of tort reform. "Hellhole" is what they call it. Marketplace's Hillary Wicai reports on what in the hellhole ... the president will be doing.

Bring back the Deux Cheveaux ...

Jan 4, 2005
Ford's motto for 2004 - the year of the car. Well today the number two automaker announced its tenth sales drop in as many months - down 3.5 percent in December. GM fell seven percent. But over at DaimlerChrysler, sales grew eleven percent. Their secret weapons: horsepower and aggressive styling. Neither of which were strong points for one of the most iconic cars of all time. The French-built Citroen 2CV, or Deux Cheveaux. It looked like umbrella on wheels, and drove like one, too. It's been 14 years since Citroen stopped making its impossibly cheap and memorably ugly car. But in the land of the Deux Cheveaux, there are more than a few romantics. John Laurenson gets us up to speed.

Remembering Y2K - The impact today

Jan 4, 2005
Remember Y2K? Chances are, you're not thinking of the year 2000. You're thinking of the predictions of doom for New Year's Day, 2000. The worry was a cascade of computer malfunctions caused by software that wasn't programmed to recognize the turn of the century. It didn't happen. In the run-up to New Years Day, 2000, governments and businesses spent more than $100 billion doing fixes and inspections. Well 5 years later, it's apparent the economic impact of Y2K was much more than that. In the conclusion of our special series from American RadioWorks, Chris Farrell reports.

Marketplace letters

Jan 4, 2005
What's that you say? Letters? OK - here's the famous Marketplace Letters segment ...

Putting a plan into action

Jan 4, 2005
United Nations teams have fanned out across the island nation of Sri Lanka to evaluate the damage and the needs of survivors. The UN will use these assessments to come up with a funding appeal for the victims by the end of the week. Miranda Kennedy traveled with a UN team leader on the southern coast of Sri Lanka.

The Year of ... Microcredit?

Jan 4, 2005
The United Nations has proclaimed 2005 the Year of Microcredit. What is microcredit, you ask? Marketplace's Alisa Roth tells us. Also, will the Year of Microcredit could be another flash-in-the-pan theme for the UN - like the Year of Eco-Tourism or the Year for Mountains? Commentator Matthew Bishop says Microcredit is a different story. He says it's an idea whose time has come.

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