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Miss Manners goes to Germany

Dec 10, 2004
In Germany, unemployment is stuck at 10 percent. The country's pension and health systems are in trouble. High wage costs are sending jobs abroad. But, what's really weighing of the minds of many Germans are things like which fork one uses for the salad? Or how does one excuse oneself to go to the bathroom during a meeting? Teaching etiquette has become one of the few growth industries in Germany. Kyle James reports from Berlin.

Go north, go north

Dec 10, 2004
Hundreds of despondent Kerry voters in Seattle, San Francisco and LA came this week to explore "The Canadian Option." That's the name of a seminar put on by a Vancouver BC immigration law firm that's capitalizing on the rush by some Americans fed up with the Bushadministration. From KPLU public radio in Seattle, Bellamy Pailthorp reports.

From rap ... to the boardroom

Dec 9, 2004
Hip Hop musician Jay-Z is officially retired as a rapper. But he's making a comeback, of sorts, as the new CEO and president of Def Jam Records. Will a recording artist be able to succeed as the chief of a big-time label? Host David Brown and Variety's Phil Gallo discuss why Jay-Z got the job.

China and the WTO

Dec 9, 2004
Tomorrow is the deadline for China to meet a promise to the World Trade Organization. It's supposed to open markets to outside investment. The Chinese would seem to be on target, if American investment is any measure: it doubled over the past year. But direct sales? That's still a work in progress. Marketplace's Jocelyn Ford explains why doing business a la Amway, Avon and Mary Kay is considered controversial.
Posted In: Canada

A clean and sober China?

Dec 9, 2004
When one surveys business in China, one cannot overlook the numerous corruption scandals. Then again, if you're a foreigner trying to do business in China, you've almost had to overlook corrupt business practices just to get your job done. The Chinese government now says its serious about cleaning things up. Commentator Samuel Porteous wonders if its time to reconsider old assumptions.

Do you remember?

Dec 9, 2004
If you plan to hit the toy store this weekend, you probably won't even notice its not there. Back in the late 1960's, facing focus-grouped competition in the toy business, the A.C. Gilbert Company threw in the towel after having sold 30 million erector sets. If the erector set is largely forgotten, then the story of its inventor was almost lost. Until writer Bruce Watson started doing research on a toy he'd received as a child. In his book "the man who changed how boys and toys were made", Watson tells the story of A.C. Gilbert, a man who sold novelties before his epiphany in 1911.

There's gold in them hills

Dec 9, 2004
Gold is starting to look attractive to a lot of folks concerned with the falling dollar. But is the investment it's cracked up to be? Host Kai Ryssdal gets some advice from Marketplace's money expert Chris Farrell.

The future of work

Dec 9, 2004
Are we headed for a revolution in the workplace? Thomas Malone, author of "The Future of Work" claims it's already started. He tells host Tess Vigeland about some of the changes we'll start to see in the workplace during the next several years.

Another way to pay for health care

Dec 9, 2004
As health care costs escalate, U.S. Firms are finding it hard to provide competitive benefits without breaking the bank. Some businesses are trying a new approach with a simple, but controversial premise: The more money you make, the more you pay for health care. From WFAE in Charlotte, Jaime Bedrin reports on one company's experience.

Mia hangs up her cleats

Dec 8, 2004
One of this country's most famous female athletes is retiring. Soccer player Mia Hamm will hang up her spikes after tonight's game between the U.S. and Mexico in Carson, California. Hamm rose to fame during the 1999 World Cup, and as Marketplace's Matthew Algeo reports, she became a marketing icon.

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